<< Thursday, November 16, 2017 >>

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Bancroft Library Roundtable: Native Claims Across Nations: Indigenous Land Ownership in Mexican and U.S. California, 1840-1860

Lecture | November 16 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Julia Lewandoski, doctoral candidate, History, UC Berkeley

 Bancroft Library

The vast majority of indigenous Californians never received land promised to them after Mexico secularized California's missions in 1834. Drawing mainly from land case files in The Bancroft Library, Julia Lewandoski will trace the stories of those who did receive grants from Mexico in the 1840s. These communities used legal systems to gain and keep land after California became a U.S. state in 1850.

Benjamin Siegel | Hungry Nation: Food, Famine, and the Making of Modern India

Lecture | November 16 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Benjamin Siegel, Assistant Professor of History, Boston University

 Institute of International Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

Benjamin Siegel is a historian of modern South Asia, with particular interests in the politics and economic life of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh in global contexts. His first book project, Hungry Nation: Food, Famine, and the Making of Modern India (Cambridge University Press, 2018), interrogates the ways in which problems of food and scarcity has structured Indian citizens’...   More >

Precarity and Dependence in the "Sharing" Economy

Lecture | November 16 | 4-6 p.m. | 2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment), IRLE Director's Room

 Juliet Schor, Professor of Sociology, Boston College

 Ruth Berins Collier, Professor of Political Science, UC Berkeley; Annette Bernhardt, Director, Low-Wage Work Program, The Labor Center at IRLE

 Institute of Research on Labor & Employment, The Scholars Strategy Network

The sharing economy debuted to grand claims about its ability to change the world for the good--it would encourage social connection, use assets more efficiently, and be better for the environment. For earners on platforms, it promised flexibility, freedom and the ability to become a "micro-entrepreneur." Ten years in, the reality is far more complex. In this talk, Schor discusses her...   More >

  RSVP online

Phoebe's Cast Collection: Two Millennia of Copies and Replicas at the Hearst Museum

Lecture | November 16 | 6-8 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

This talk will provide an introduction to UC Berkeley's collection of nearly 300 casts of Greek and Roman sculptures from the Classical period - examining both how these plaster copies were made from original sculptures in Europe, and how they travelled to California at the turn of the 20th century. This will be contextualized within a larger discussion of the copying tradition, starting in the...   More >

Cripping the Renaissance: Lamentation, Consolation, and Disability in Cervantes and Milton: a talk by Elizabeth B. Bearden

Lecture | November 16 | 6-8 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Elizabeth B. Bearden, Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 Department of English, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Program in Disability Studies

"In this talk, I focus on works by two disabled authors of the early modern period: Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra and John Milton. I propose that these authors draw on the art of consolation—particularly Petrarch’s De Remediis and the Psalms—to depict the lows and highs of their lived experience of disability. Furthermore, they employ transgressive reappropriation when responding to ablist...   More >