<< Wednesday, October 18, 2017 >>

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Spectacular Disappearances: Celebrity and Privacy, 1696-1801: Townsend Book Chat with Julia Fawcett

Lecture | October 18 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Julia Fawcett examines the stages, pages, and streets of eighteenth-century London as England's first modern celebrities performed their own strange and spectacular self-representations.

Honoring Goddesses in a Family of Ancient Egyptian Tomb Workers: the case for Anuket and Hathor

Lecture | October 18 | 12-1 p.m. | 254 Barrows Hall

 Deanna Kiser-Go, Graduate Student Affairs Officer, Dept. of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley

 Near Eastern Studies

The Foreman Neferhotep and his immediate descendants held positions of influence in the Deir el-Medina workman’s community during the 19th Dynasty (c. 1307-1196 BCE). During their careers they oversaw the process of cutting and decorating the nearby royal tombs in the Valley of the Kings, but when it came time to design their own tombs their personal choices are apparent. This paper addresses how...   More >

Dramaturgy as Curation: Bringing Literature to the Stage: Arts + Design Wednesdays at BAMPFA

Lecture | October 18 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Christopher Herold, Continuing Lecturer, Department of Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies; Director of Program, Summer Training Intensive, American Conservatory Theater, UC Berkeley; Nina Ball, Award-winning Set Designer, American Conservatory Theater, Aurora Theatre, Marin Theater Company, Shotgun Players

 Arts + Design

Christopher Herold and Nina Ball, director and designer for the fall 2017 TDPS production of Mary Zimmerman’s Metamorphoses, will explore upon their process and decisions in bringing this work of literature to the stage-- how they visualized Zimmerman’s fantastic world where the human and the divine collide and where actors perform in a large pool of water.

Biography

Biological Kinship Variation at Campovalano and Alfedena, Iron Age, Central Italy

Lecture | October 18 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Evan Muzzall, University of California, Berkeley D-Lab

 Archaeological Research Facility

Biological distance analysis (“biodistance”) is a powerful tool in the bioarchaeologist’s toolkit. Although burial organization does not mirror social organization, it can help us better understand how past humans structured death and in part society via systematic patterns in burial location. This presentation discusses biodistance analyses of cranial and dental metric and dental morphological...   More >

President Putin and President Trump

Lecture | October 18 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

How did the US-Russian relationship come to such a low point? What can we expect from the relationship between presidents Putin and Trump?

Robert Thurman | Why does the Dalai Lama say he is "Son of Nālandā"?: The inaugural ISAS-VSB Lecture on Religion in the Modern World

Lecture | October 18 | 5-7 p.m. | Bechtel Engineering Center, Sibley Auditorium

 Robert A. F. Thurman, Jey Tsong Khapa Professor of Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Studies, Department of Religion, Columbia University; President, Tibet House U.S., President of the American Institute of Buddhist Studies

 Jake Dalton, Khyentse Professor and Chair, Dept. of South and Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Vedanta Society Berkeley, Center for Buddhist Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, Himalayan Studies Program, Townsend Center for the Humanities, The Mira and Ajay Shingal Center for Dharma Studies-Graduate Theological Union, P.Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for Silk Road Studies

A lecture by Prof. Robert A. F. Thurman, professor of Indo-Tibetan Buddhist studies at Columbia University, and co-founder of Tibet House US, a nonprofit dedicated to the preservation and promotion of Tibetan civilization.

Movement as Research | Cursors: Undoing Bodies Moved by Language

Lecture | October 18 | 5:30-7:30 p.m. | 308A Doe Library

 Will Rawls

 Arts Research Center

What moves us, writes us, and undoes us? Rawls reflects on his research-based practice of interrogating the matter of marked bodies and the tools of language. Reflecting on his current collaboration with poet Claudia Rankine, and his practices in multiple media, Rawls speculates on the social and aesthetic dimensions of how a racial imaginary operates in his choreographic work.

Theoretically Speaking Series — Black Holes, Firewalls, and the Limits of Quantum Computers

Lecture | October 18 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  David Brower Center

 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Scott Aaronson, University of Texas at Austin

 Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing

Quantum computers are proposed devices that would exploit quantum mechanics to solve certain specific problems dramatically faster than we know how to solve them with today's computers. In the popular press, quantum computers are often presented not just as an exciting frontier of science and technology (which they are), but as magic devices that would work by simply trying every possible...   More >

ARCH Lecture: Martyn Dade-Robertson

Lecture | October 18 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED, OCT 18, 6:30pm. Martyn Dade-Robertson