<< Tuesday, April 11, 2017 >>

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Antisocial Computing: Explaining and Predicting Negative Behavior Online

Lecture | April 11 | 9:40-11 a.m. | 202 South Hall

 Justin Cheng

 Information, School of

New computational methods for understanding and predicting antisocial behavior and misinformation in online communities.

Blind Love, Romanticism, and Rousseau’s Julie

Lecture | April 11 | 12-2 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, 4229 - French Department Library

 Alexandra Schamel, Visiting Scholar, Universität Munich

 Comparative Literature, French Studies Program, Institute of European Studies

The lecture examines to what extent Rousseau’s epistolary novel Julie ou la Nouvelle Héloïse modifies the visual paradigm of eighteenth-century anthropology, as seen in Rousseau’s ideology of substantial nature, by introducing dynamics which produce obscurité, an unattainable dimension of inwardness. The argument leads to the proposal that the subject’s strategies of hiding, masking and...   More >

Why Vikings, Frozen and Kahoot are Important for Norway’s Future – and What Norway can Learn from Silicon Valley

Lecture | April 11 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Gro Dyrnes, Regional Director Americas, Director San Francisco and Silicon Valley, representing Norway in the Nordic Innovation House Board and in VisitNorway

 Institute of European Studies

The discussion over the last years in Norway has been centered around value creation “after oil”. This presentation will discuss advantages and challenges in Norway’s innovation system and culture and will also compare this to the Silicon Valley ecosystem and mentality.

Gro Dyrnes was formerly the Chief of Staff, Regional Director for Western Europe and the Nordics and IT-director, in...   More >

Blind Love, Romanticism, and Rousseau’s Julie

Lecture | April 11 | 12-2 p.m. | 4229 Dwinelle Hall

 Alexandra Schamel, Universität Munich, Dept. of Comparative Literature, French Studies & IES Visiting Scholar

 Institute of European Studies, Department of French

The lecture examines to what extent Rousseau’s epistolary novel Julie ou la Nouvelle Héloïse modifies the visual paradigm of eighteenth-century anthropology, as seen in Rousseau’s ideology of substantial nature, by introducing dynamics which produce obscurité, an unattainable dimension of inwardness. The argument leads to the proposal that the subject’s strategies of hiding, masking and...   More >

When Death Comes, He Steals the Infant: Children and Mortuary Practice on the Giza Plateau: AHMA Noon Colloquium

Lecture | April 11 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Jessica Kaiser, UC Berkeley

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

The AHMA Noon Colloquium is a series of informal papers presented at noon in 7205 Dwinelle Hall.

Annual Martin Meyerson Faculty Research Lectures

Lecture | April 11 | 4-5 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Thomas W. Laqueur

 Academic Senate

Thomas W. Laqueur
Helen Fawcett Distinguished Professor of History

How Dogs Make Us Human

100 Years Later: The Lynching of Grandpa Crawford

Lecture | April 11 | 4-5:30 p.m. | D-37 Hearst Field Annex

 College of Environmental Design

TUE, APR 11, 4:00pm. Using her family’s painful story as a lens through which we can examine our nation’s history, US History Scholar Doria Dee Johnson will describe how past injustices propelled her from the role of daughter to genealogist to activist to

Making Fit, Pricing Air: High-Rises Explode Across Phnom Penh

Lecture | April 11 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Sylvia Nam, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, UC Irvine

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

This talk examines pent-up expertise and upward pressures on land prices that have generated the market dynamics leading to the expansive rollout of condominium towers in Phnom Penh. The speaker received her Ph.D. in City & Regional Planning from UC Berkeley.

Sylvia Nam

100 Years Later: The Lynching of (Grandpa) Anthony Crawford: Has racial difference ended or simply evolved?

Lecture | April 11 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Hearst Field Annex, Room D-37

 Doria Dee Johnson, Public Historian and Activist

 The On The Same Page Program, Equity and Inclusion, Vice Chancellor, College of Environmental Design, Department of African American Studies, Fannie Lou Hamer Black Resource Center, Department of Sociology

Doria Dee Johnson’s great-grandfather was lynched in South Carolina in 1916. Using her family’s painful story as a lens through which we can examine our nation’s history, Johnson will describe how past injustices propelled her from the role of daughter to genealogist to activist to scholar, and now international human rights and restorative justice agent.

 The talk and reception are free and open to all UC Berkeley students, faculty, staff, and community members.

Public historian and activist Doria Dee Johnson

Neighbourhood Perceptions of the Ukraine Crisis: From the Soviet Union into Eurasia?

Lecture | April 11 | 4:30-6:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Katarzyna Stoklosa, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Public Management, Centre for Border Region Studies, University of Southern Denmark, Sønderborg; Jussi Laine, Assistant Professor of Multidisciplinary Border Studies at the Karelian Institute, University of Eastern Finland; James Scott, Professor of Multidisciplinary Border Studies at the Karelian Institute, University of Eastern Finland; Gerhard Besier, Director, Sigmund Neumann Institute (Berlin, Dresden, Flensburg); Steen Bo Frandsen, Head of Centre for Border Region Studies, University of Southern Denmark, Sønderborg

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Recent events in Ukraine and Russia and the subsequent incorporation of Crimea into the Russian state, with the support of some circles of inhabitants of the peninsula, have shown that the desire of people to belong to the Western part of Europe should not automatically be assumed. Discussing different perceptions of the Ukrainian-Russian war in neighbouring countries, this book offers an...   More >

“Advancing Human Rights in a Rightward World: Challenges for International Institutions and Civil Society”: A Talk By: NAVANETHEM PILLAY

Lecture | April 11 | 5-7 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Goldberg Room

 Center for Race and Gender, Institute for South Asia Studies, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Human Rights Center, International and Area Studies (IAS)

“Advancing Human Rights in a Rightward World: Challenges for International Institutions and Civil Society”

A Talk By: NAVANETHEM PILLAY
United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, 2008-2014 and Judge of the International Criminal Court, 2003-2008

Opening Remarks: PAUL ALIVISATOS, Vice Chancellor for Research and Samsung Distinguished Professor of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, UC,...   More >

CALIFORNIA Live! A Dream Denied? The Immigrant Experience in the Campus Community

Lecture | April 11 | 7-9:15 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Robert D. Haas ’64, Chairman-Emeritus, Levi Strauss & Co.; Saira Hussain ’09, J.D. ’13, Staff Attorney, Asian Law Caucus; Meng So ’10, M.A, Director, Undocumented Student Program, UC Berkeley; Seth Grossman, Chief of Staff, University of California President Janet Napolitano; Valeska Castaneda-Puerto ’16, Program Manager, Student Support, Cal Alumni Association

 Diane Dwyer ’87, Veteran Bay Area journalist, Dwyer Media Consulting

 Cal Alumni Association

Join the Cal Alumni Association as we present our first CALIFORNIA Live! event of 2017 — an exciting panel discussion, “A Dream Denied? The Immigrant Experience in the Campus Community.”

$20 CAA Member, $10 Current Student or Young Cal Alumni (Classes of 2006-2016), $25 General Admission

 View Free Live Streaming Event: https://californialiveonline.eventbrite.com. Register online or by calling David Smith at 510-900-8256, or by emailing David Smith at david.smith@alumni.berkeley.edu