Critic’s choice

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Mark Morris Dance Group / Pepperland: Sgt. Pepper at 50
Critic’s choice

Lecture: Zooarchaeology and Heritage — The History of Sea Otters in Southeast Alaska

Thursday, September 20 | 5-6 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)
After having been absent for nearly 150 years, the re-entry of sea otters into the food web has unsettled people who make their living from the sea. This project explores the longer-term history of sea otter use through zooarchaeology. A reception will follow.MORE about Zooarchaeology and Heritage — The History of Sea Otters in Southeast Alaska

Film: The President

An iron-fisted tyrant finds himself on the run — with only his young grandson as company — in Makhmalbaf’s modern parable of power and uprising, inspired by the Arab Spring and its accompanying discontents. Filmed in Georgia with an all-Georgian cast, this film underlines how violence begets violence, and envisions what can be done to break the cycle.MORE about <em>The President</em>

Lecture: Stan Ovshinsky — The Man Who Saw Tomorrow

Thursday, September 20 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 330 Blum Hall
The Man Who Saw Tomorrow is the first full-length biography of visionary Stanford R. Ovshinsky whose energy and information innovations continue to fuel our economy. MORE about Stan Ovshinsky — <em>The Man Who Saw Tomorrow</em>

Stan and Iris Ovshinsky Photo courtesy of Stanford R. Ovshinsky.

Seminar: Borderlands and Border Crossings in the 19th-Century World

Thursday, September 20 | 4-6 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall | Note change in date and location
As a historian who approaches the U.S. West and Mexican North primarily from the perspective of their shared borderlands, Professor Samuel Truett is interested in the crossings — social, cultural, and environmental — that have connected these two regions to the rest of the Americas and the world at large.MORE about Borderlands and Border Crossings in the 19th-Century World

Lecture: Seeds of Resistance — The Fight to Save Our Food Supply, Mark Schapiro

Thursday, September 20 | 2-4 p.m. | Julia Morgan Hall UC Botanical Garden
Veteran investigative journalist Mark Schapiro plunges into the struggle already underway for control of seeds, the ground-zero ingredient for our food. Three quarters of the seed varieties on Earth in 1900 had become extinct by 2015. In Seeds of Resistance, Schapiro discusses the struggle over the seeds that remain, one that will determine the long-term security of our food supply in the face of climate volatility. MORE about <em>Seeds of Resistance — The Fight to Save Our Food Supply</em>, Mark Schapiro

Performing Arts: Serving Face with Mocha Fapalatte

Thursday, September 20 | 5-8 p.m. | Hearst Museum of Anthropology
Join Bay Area performer Mocha Fapalatte for an interactive drag makeup demonstration at the Hearst Museum. Alongside the current exhibit, Face to Face, Mocha will speak about her craft, share makeup tips and tricks, and show how one’s face sells a performance through live lip-synch demos.MORE about Serving Face with Mocha Fapalatte

Conference: Constructing Post-Imperium Identity — Taiwan and Eastern Europe

September 20 – 21, 2018 every day | 10 a.m.-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library
Taiwan studies scholars from Eastern Europe bring their varied national experience in exploring Taiwanese identity construction together with scholars from the US and Taiwan to explore similarities and differences in how this has proceeded with the end of formal (Japanese) and informal (Soviet) imperialism.MORE about Constructing Post-Imperium Identity — Taiwan and Eastern Europe

Film: La terra trema

Friday, September 21 | 7-9:40 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Luchino Visconti’s masterpiece of austere lyricism was shot in the Sicilian village of Aci Trezza. There, fishermen are kept in poverty by middle-class wholesalers. The Valastro family, led by the impassioned young N’toni, attempt to overcome this oppression and are ostracized in their ancient community. MORE about <em>La terra trema</em>

La terra trema

Reading: East Bay Poets

Friday, September 21 | 6-7 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Readings from local poets Barbara Jane Reyes, winner of a James Laughlin award and author of Invocation to Daughters; Ingrid Rojas Contreras, book columnist for KQED and author of Fruit of the Drunken Tree; Maw Shein Win, first poet laureate of El Cerrito, former artist in residence at the Headlands Center for the Arts, and author of Invisible Gifts, Poems; and Vanessa Hua, a San Francisco Chronicle columnist, California Book Award nominee, and author of the novel A River of Stars.MORE about East Bay Poets

Lecture: Aruna D’Souza in Conversation

Friday, September 21 | 5-7 p.m. | Maude Fife Room, Room 315 Wheeler Hall
Aruna D’Souza writes about modern and contemporary art; intersectional feminisms and other forms of politics; and how museums shape our views of each other and the world. The New York Times calls her most recent book, Whitewalling: Art, Race & Protest in 3 Acts “a laser beam of a book, unwavering and on target." With Allan D’Souza, associate professor and chair of the department of Art Practice.MORE about Aruna D’Souza in Conversation

Music: UC Berkeley Symphony Orchestra

September 21 – 22, 2018 every day | 8 p.m. | Hertz Concert Hall
Music director David Milnes leads the UC Berkeley Symphony Orchestra in Bartok's "Miraculous Mandarin," Jennifer Higdon's "Blue Cathedral" and Brahms' "Symphony No. 2."MORE about UC Berkeley Symphony Orchestra

Film: The Apple

Saturday, September 22 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Samira Makhmalbaf’s directorial debut (at age seventeen) blends a fictionalized plot over a shocking real-life tale of two sisters whose parents had locked them in their home for their entire lives, to “protect” them like flowers. After the screening, enjoy a Film to Table dinner at Babette, the cafe at BAMPFA. Purchase dinner tickets in advance at babettecafe.com (film tickets must be purchased separately).MORE about <em>The Apple</em>

The Apple

Workshop: This Is Not a Gun — Ceramics with Cara Levine

Saturday, September 22 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
In this workshop, artist Cara Levine encourages participants to give presence to objects that have been mistaken for guns by police officers in civilian shootings, calling out their not-gun-ness by sculpting their shapes in clay. The gathering, cohosted by Ekaette Ekong, offers a nonjudgmental space to site the issues of this historically dense and complicated crisis within our own bodies and stories.MORE about This Is Not a Gun — Ceramics with Cara Levine

Film: Ex Libris: The New York Public Library

Saturday, September 22 | 2-5 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Frederick Wiseman’s latest documentary Ex Libris demonstrates the dedication of the New York Public Library, with eighty-eight branches spread across five boroughs, to support and reflect the vibrant diversity of the city at its best.MORE about <em>Ex Libris: The New York Public Library</em>

Ex Libris: The New York Public Library

Music: Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis and special guest Jon Batiste

Sunday, September 23 | 5:30-7 p.m. | Hearst Greek Theatre
International jazz ambassador, nine-time Grammy winner, and Pulitzer Prize recipient Wynton Marsalis and Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra are joined by charismatic pianist and music director of The Late Show with Stephen Colbert’s house band, Jon Batiste, for a program celebrating the legacy of Duke Ellington.MORE about Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis and special guest Jon Batiste

Wynton Marsalis

Special Event: Fall Equinox Sound Bath

Sunday, September 23 | 10:30-11:30 a.m. | UC Botanical Garden
Celebrate the beginning of fall with a special outdoor concert of quartz crystal singing bowls and finely tuned gongs within a grove of redwoods.MORE about Fall Equinox Sound Bath

Panel Discussion: Arts + Design and the Global Climate Summit: Reflections and Next Steps with Shannon Jackson, Dan Kammen, and Orville Schell

Monday, September 24 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
At the close of the Global Climate Summit, reflect on the climate challenges facing the world, and discuss possible solutions and next steps our community, state, and nation can take to combat global climate change. Hear from UC Berkeley faculty, participants in the COAL + ICE exhibition, and Bay Area climate artists collectively advancing environmental awareness.MORE about Arts + Design and the Global Climate Summit: Reflections and Next Steps with Shannon Jackson, Dan Kammen, and Orville Schell

Dance: Full — Fauxnique

Monday, September 24 | 7-9 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Fauxnique (Monique Jenkinson) performs Drag Movement Study #3, an investigation of glamour as process. Dislodging the practice of drag from its traditional reliance on illusion and concealment, Fauxnique exploits the space of the museum to revel in the reveal, shining full light upon the underpinnings and inviting viewers into the foundation of drag performance.MORE about Full — Fauxnique

Lecture: Presidential Power and Individual Rights with Daniel Farber

Tuesday, September 25 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Free Speech Movement Café (Moffitt Library)
Presidential power is always a hot topic, but never more so than today. This lecture will explain the constitutional limits on the president and how individual rights are affected. The president is uniquely powerful —
but not above the law. Learn about the expansion and limits of presidential power and its impact on American people with Dan Farber, Berkeley Law.MORE about Presidential Power and Individual Rights with Daniel Farber

Lecture: The Senses of Democracy: Perception, Politics, and Culture in Latin America, Francine Masiello

Wednesday, September 26 | 12-1 p.m. | Geballe Room Stephens Hall
In The Senses of Democracy: Perception, Politics, and Culture in Latin America, Francine Masiello traces the evolution of “sense work” in literary texts, the visual arts, periodical culture, and history. She argues that when the discourse on democracy is altered or threatened, the representation of our sensing bodies helps shape democratic practice and rebellion, cultural crisis, and social change.MORE about The Senses of Democracy: Perception, Politics, and Culture in Latin America, Francine Masiello

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