Critic’s choice

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Mark Morris Dance Group / Pepperland: Sgt. Pepper at 50
Critic’s choice

Panel Discussion: Is a Habitable Climate a Human Right? Juliana v. the United States

Tuesday, October 23 | 12:45-2 p.m. | 110 Boalt Hall, School of Law
In the case of Juliana vs. the United States slated to be heard in U.S. District Court this month, 21 youth plaintiffs assert that “through the government’s affirmative actions that cause climate change, it has violated the youngest generation’s constitutional rights to life, liberty and property…and failed to protect essential public trust resources.” A discussion with Kelly Matheson, Jordan Diamond, Sharon Duggan et al: Can litigation and advocacy protect the vulnerable peoples of the world where democracy and politics have failed? MORE about Is a Habitable Climate a Human Right? Juliana v. the United States

Panel Discussion: Indivisible Tohono O'odham — Indigenous Organizing in the Southwest

Tuesday, October 23 | 1-2:30 p.m. | 554 Barrows Hall
Bifurcated by the border since the Gadsden Purchase in 1854, the Tohono Oodham (TO) have fought for medical treatment, citizenship status, and border crossing privileges for both "parts" of the community. Building off of that legacy of TO activism around the U.S.-Mexico Border is the contemporary group, Indivisible Tohono O'odham and their work interrogating the limits of indigeneity, citizenship, and the spatiality of the so-called "Nations within."MORE about Indivisible Tohono O'odham — Indigenous Organizing in the Southwest

Lecture: Optimal Robot Action for and around People with Anca Dragan

Tuesday, October 23 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 190 Doe Library
Estimation, planning, control and learning are giving us robots that can generate good behavior given a specified objective and set of constraints. Anca Dragan explores how humans enter this behavior-generation picture, and study two complementary challenges: 1) how to optimize behavior when the robot is not acting in isolation, but needs to coordinate or collaborate with people; and 2) what to optimize in order to get the behavior we want.MORE about Optimal Robot Action for and around People with Anca Dragan

Lecture: From the Accelerating Universe to Accelerating Science

Wednesday, October 24 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center
Twenty years ago, astronomers were astonished to learn from observations of exploding stars that cosmic expansion is speeding up, attributed to dark energy. Scientists are working to learn more about its nature, and Professor Robert P. Kirshner will summarize the present state of knowledge and look ahead to new ways to use infrared observations of supernovae to improve understanding. MORE about From the Accelerating Universe to Accelerating Science

Lecture: Picturing Identity: Contemporary American Autobiography in Image and Text, Hertha Sweet Wong

Wednesday, October 24 | 12-1 p.m. | Geballe Room Stephens Hall
In Picturing Identity, Hertha Sweet Wong explores the intersection of writing and visual art in the autobiographical work of Art Spiegelman, Faith Ringgold, Leslie Marmon Silko, and other American writers-artists who experiment with hybrid forms of self-narration.MORE about Picturing Identity: Contemporary American Autobiography in Image and Text, Hertha Sweet Wong

Colloquium: Computational Complexity in Theory and in Practice with Richard Karp

Wednesday, October 24 | 4-5 p.m. | 306 (HP Auditorium) Soda Hall
Richard Karp received the Turing Award in 1985 and the National Medal of Science in 1996. He will discuss computational complexity theory and approaches to several canonical problems: satisfiability solving, linear programming, integer programming, the traveling-salesman problem, bin packing, matching and number partitioning.MORE about Computational Complexity in Theory and in Practice with Richard Karp

Film: Persona

Wednesday, October 24 | 3:10-4:40 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Ingmar Bergman’s masterpiece chronicles an actress named Elizabeth (Liv Ullmann) who elects to become silent and is put into the care of Alma (Bibi Andersson), a nurse companion. By the end of the film, the two characters are engaged in a desperate Strindberg-like duel of identities, and Bergman has turned that struggle into a metaphor for the fate of language, art, and consciousness itself.MORE about <em>Persona</em>

Colloquium: The Chosen Ones: Black Men and the Politics of Redemption

Wednesday, October 24 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 117, Academic Innovation Studio Dwinelle Hall
The discussion will be based on Nikki Jones's new book, The Chosen Ones: Black Men and the Politics of Redemption, which centers on the struggles faced by formerly incarcerated black men trying to fit back into their communities and the obstacles they face when attempting to integrate into greater society.MORE about The Chosen Ones: Black Men and the Politics of Redemption

Seminar: Complexity and Security — Managing the Tradeoffs

Thursday, October 25 | 12-1 p.m. | 205 South Hall
As part of the Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity's Lunch Seminar Series, Dr. Herb Lin explores how current trends in technology innovation suggest that societal demands for increased functionality conflict with the imperatives of robust cybersecurity. Articulating the nature of this tradeoff is a useful first step, but an understanding of how to manage that tradeoff in a systematic and disciplined manner remains elusive. A light lunch will be served. RSVP to attend.MORE about Complexity and Security — Managing the Tradeoffs

Reading: Berkeley Writers at Work — Edward Frenkel

Thursday, October 25 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Morrison Library, 101 Doe Library Doe Library
Edward Frenkel, professor of mathematics, will read from his work, be interviewed about his writing process, and answer questions from the audience. Frenkel is the author of The New York Times bestseller and award-winning book Love and Math, which weaves his personal and academic journey from the Soviet Union to Harvard and then Berkeley with a profound appreciation for the beauty and wonder of mathematics.MORE about Berkeley Writers at Work — Edward Frenkel

Edward Frenkel

Lecture: Anatomy of a Genocide — The Life and Death of a Town Called Buczacz

For more than 400 years, the Eastern European border town of Buczacz was home to a highly diverse citizenry. Then came World War II, and three years later the entire Jewish population had been murdered by German and Ukrainian police, while Ukrainian nationalists eradicated Polish residents. Professor Omer Bartov will explain how ethnic cleansing doesn’t occur as is so often portrayed in popular history, with the quick ascent of a vitriolic political leader and the unleashing of military might. It begins in seeming peace, slowly and often unnoticed.MORE about Anatomy of a Genocide — The Life and Death of a Town Called Buczacz

Panel Discussion: Getting the Facts on Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment

Thursday, October 25 | 4-6 p.m. | 820 Barrows Hall
Join a panel discussion and Q&A focused on the limits of what can be learned about sexual violence and harassment from personal narratives that are shared online, as well as the question of what is missed in survey data related to sexual violence and harassment. Panelists include Laura Nelson, Edward Wasserman, Lisa García Bedolla, Aya de Leon and Billy Curtis.MORE about Getting the Facts on Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment

Conference: 2018 Human Rights Fellowship Conference

Friday, October 26 | 12-5 p.m. | 215 Boalt Hall, School of Law
The Human Rights Centers' 2018 Fellows have returned from their summer fieldwork and will discuss pressing human rights topics at the annual Human Rights Fellowship Conference. Enjoy brief TED-style talks and panel discussions related to racial injustice and the death penalty, child labor, the mental health effects of separating families at the U.S./Mexico border as well as inspirational lessons from human rights defenders and survivors around the world.MORE about 2018 Human Rights Fellowship Conference

Theater: Barber Shop Chronicles

Friday, October 26 | 8-10 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall
Barber Shop Chronicles, created by Nigerian-born, UK-based poet and playwright Inua Ellams, explores the diversity of black male identity through the rituals and verbal banter of the urban barbershop. The cast riffs on topics both personal and political as we eavesdrop on conversations in six different barbershops over the course of a single day. Continues Oct. 27-28.MORE about <em>Barber Shop Chronicles</em>

Barber Shop Chronicles

Panel Discussion: Allan deSouza — How Art Can Be Thought

Friday, October 26 | 5-7 p.m. | Rm. 120 Kroeber Hall | Note change in location
A public conversation around Professor Allan deSouza's newest publication, "How Art Can Be Thought: A Handbook for Change," exploring ideas such as: What terms do we use to describe and evaluate art, and how do we judge if art is good, and if it is for the social good?MORE about Allan deSouza — How Art Can Be Thought

Colloquium: Family Separations: Beyond Violence Histories to Building Belonging

Friday, October 26 | 12-2 p.m. | Banatao Auditorium Sutardja Dai Hall
This event will present diverse perspectives on the political, legal, social, economic, and health impacts of historic and current family separations in U.S. immigration and incarceration systems, and will identify and discuss alternative strategies to advocating for inclusive policy in order to advance belonging and build community. With Angie Junck, supervising attorney at the Immigrant Legal Resource Center; Ericka Huggins is a human rights activist, poet, educator; and Heide Castañeda, associate professor of anthropology at University of South Florida Research.MORE about Family Separations: Beyond Violence Histories to Building Belonging

Panel Discussion: Bay Area Conversations — The Arts of South Asia and its Diasporas

Friday, October 26 | 9:30 a.m.-4:45 p.m. | 10 (ISAS Conf. Room) Stephens Hall
Join in a day of conversations at the Institute for South Asia Studies with art historians, curators, and artists in the Bay Area. The day-long symposium will end with a public conversation around Professor Allan deSouza’s forthcoming book How Art Can Be Thought: A Handbook for Change.MORE about Bay Area Conversations — The Arts of South Asia and its Diasporas

Allan deSouza, Borough Boogie Woogie

Theater: Leila's Quest for Flight

Saturday, October 27 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | Hearst Museum of Anthropology
Written and directed by Torange Yeghiazarian, Leila’s Quest for Flight is drawn from Palestinian folktales. When an optometrist shatters little Leila’s dream of becoming a pilot, a menagerie of mythic birds gather to help her accomplish her goal. 30-minute performance is followed by 20-minute Q&A session with the cast.MORE about <em>Leila's Quest for Flight</em>

Leila's Quest for Flight

Theater: Barber Shop Chronicles

Saturday, October 27 | 8-10 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall
Barber Shop Chronicles, created by Nigerian-born, UK-based poet and playwright Inua Ellams, explores the diversity of black male identity through the rituals and verbal banter of the urban barbershop. The cast riffs on topics both personal and political as we eavesdrop on conversations in six different barbershops over the course of a single day. Continues Oct. 28.MORE about <em>Barber Shop Chronicles</em>

The Blessed Ones

Sunday, October 28 | 3-4:20 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Ingmar Bergman’s first feature after abandoning 35mm film for television technology, The Blessed Ones is a tale of tortured love between a middle-aged woman and a slightly younger man, and the jealousies that arise from their outward differences and internal melancholies.MORE about

ONGOING: Exhibits around campus >