<< Week of October 17 >>

Sunday, October 14, 2018

Garden Goddesses: Four California Women and Their Legendary Gardens

Lecture | October 14 | 10-11:30 a.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Celebrate the achievements of great women gardeners! In his new talk, “Garden Goddesses: Four California Women and Their Legendary Gardens,” popular garden writer Donald Olson takes you on an informative and entertaining tour of some spectacular California gardens and introduces you to the remarkable women who created them.

$20 / $15 UCBG Member

  Register online

Monday, October 15, 2018

Sholem Aleichem on the South Side of Chicago: The Story and Songs of the Rediscovered 1905 Musical Stempenyu

Lecture | October 15 | 12-1 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

In June of 1905, Sholem Aleichem—author of the Tevye Stories—met in Warsaw with theater producers Spivakovsky and Adler, and agreed to pen adaptations of his fiction works for theatrical production on stages throughout the Russian Empire. Only a few months later, caught in the anti-Jewish violence that accompanied the outbreak of the 1905 Revolution, Aleichem quickly made plans to flee Russia...   More >

Architecture Lecture: Takaharu Tezuka: Nostalgic Future

Lecture | October 15 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 Takaharu Tezuka

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), College of Environmental Design, Consulate General of Japan in San Francisco

NOSTALGIC FUTURE
Real human life is supported by latest technologies. Our good future is depending on the respect for the wisdom from our past. We are still a part of the whole environment, yet still in the most advanced society.

ABOUT TAKAHARU TEZUKA
Architect / President of Tezuka Architects / Professor of Tokyo City University

1964 Born in Tokyo, Japan
1987 B. Arch.,...   More >

Image and Amnesia

Lecture | October 15 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Kerry Tribe

 Arts + Design, Berkeley Center for New Media

Kerry Tribe’s work in film, video, installation and other media raises questions about the elusive and ephemeral aspects of human experience including memory, empathy and linguistic communication. Often working with multiple projections and timed loops, her projects are designed to structurally underscore their content. Tribe’s fascination with the literal mechanics of moving images suggests that...   More >

Image and Amnesia

Lecture | October 15 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Osher Theater, BAMPFA

 Kerry Tribe

 Berkeley Center for New Media, Wiesenfeld Visiting Artist Lecture Series

Kerry Tribe’s work in film, video, installation and other media raises questions about the elusive and ephemeral aspects of human experience including memory, empathy and linguistic communication. Often working with multiple projections and timed loops, her projects are designed to structurally underscore their content. Tribe’s fascination with the literal mechanics of moving images suggests that...   More >

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Indigenous Peoples in India: Social Consequences of Land Rights Legislation: Gender and Resilience

Lecture | October 16 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 554 Barrows Hall

 Indrani Sigamany

 Native American Studies & Ethnic Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

In the Aravalli Hill forests of Rajasthan, where access to justice remains uneven and elusive for indigenous peoples, a group of Adivasi women are claiming land rights through activistism. In the context of gender inequality in predominantly patriarchal societies, the threat to loss of lands, forest based livelihoods and traditional conservation, is experienced more acutely by women.

Indigenous Peoples in India: Social Consequences of Land Rights Legislation: Gender and Resilience

Lecture | October 16 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 554 Barrows Hall

 Indrani Sigamany

 Native American Studies & Ethnic Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

In the Aravalli Hill forests of Rajasthan, where access to justice remains uneven and elusive for indigenous peoples, a group of Adivasi women are claiming land rights through activistism. In the context of gender inequality in predominantly patriarchal societies, the threat to loss of lands, forest based livelihoods and traditional conservation, is experienced more acutely by women.

Addressing Us: On the Transformations of Public Space as Art —Hegel, Arendt, and Jacobi Revisited

Lecture | October 16 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Marita Tatari, Feodor-Lynen-Fellow (Humboldt Foundation), German Department, UC Berkeley

 The Program in Critical Theory

Hegel on art as action and Arendt on action as public space converge. This convergence is not about what action, art and public space should be. It is about the historical transformations of the common condition—the symbolic order—as it relates to heterogeneity. Surprisingly, both Hegel and Arendt reveal a view of these transformations that is not that of the subject and its purposiveness....   More >

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

What is in a Category? Telling Political Refugees and Economic Migrants Apart

Lecture | October 17 | 11 a.m.-2 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Jutta Allmendinger, WZB Berlin Social Science Center

 David Miliband, International Rescue Committee

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West - Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC, ZEIT-Stiftung Ebelin und Gerd Bucerius, International Rescue Committee, Thomas Mann House Los Angeles

Please join us for our Annual Bucerius Lecture with David Miliband, President and CEO of the International Rescue Committee, followed by a conversation with Jutta Allmendinger, President of the WZB Berlin Social Science Center.

Unlike Europe, where there are two separate migration issues that are coming together in a complicated way, the US conversation on migration has until recently been...   More >

  RSVP online by October 14.

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Bryan Wagner: The Tar Baby: A Global History

Lecture | October 17 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Wagner offers a fresh analysis of this deceptively simple story of a fox, a rabbit, and a doll made of tar and turpentine, tracing its history and connections to slavery, colonialism, and global trade.

Overcoming Specialist Silos: Lessons from Zooarchaeology on Data Creation, Access, and Reuse

Lecture | October 17 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Sarah Kansa, Archaeological Research Facility & Open Context

 Archaeological Research Facility

Drawing on zooarchaeological case studies from Etruscan Italy and Neolithic Anatolia, this talk highlights the challenges specialists face in ensuring that their work contributes to the bigger picture of archaeological interpretation.

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Bryan Wagner: The Tar Baby: A Global History

Lecture | October 17 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Wagner offers a fresh analysis of this deceptively simple story of a fox, a rabbit, and a doll made of tar and turpentine, tracing its history and connections to slavery, colonialism, and global trade.

Space-In-Between: Dialogical Urban Space in Contemporary Iran

Lecture | October 17 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 M. Reza Shirazi, Institute for Urban and Regional Development

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Contemporary architecture and urban space in Iran registers itself between two extremes of modernity and tradition. In this lecture, I first narrate the conflict between these two extremes and its manifestation in the architecture and urban planning of Tehran starting from mid-19th century. I then present a critical analysis of the writings and works of three leading architects, Kamran Diba,...   More >

Litquake

Lecture | October 17 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison St, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

With Anita Amirrezvani, Tamim Ansary, Louise Nayer, Aimee Phan, and Jake Warner

Democratizing Data Science

Lecture | October 17 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Aditya Parameswaran

 Information, School of

Making it easy for individuals and teams to manage, analyze, and draw insights from large datasets.

Thursday, October 18, 2018

Dance, Heritage, and the Island: A Cuban in Oakland with Royland Lobato

Lecture | October 18 |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Royland Lobato

 Arts + Design

In 2005, Royland Lobato arrived in the Bay Area from his native Cuba. Born in Guantanamo, his fascination with the folklore of the island drove him to become a teacher of Cuba’s musical and dance traditions, especially its Afro-Cuban elements, but also its contemporary popular expression, such as rueda de casino, rumba, son, and other forms. In this lecture, Lobato will discuss his experience as...   More >

Bancroft Library Roundtable: Education as the Project of Freedom: A Study of the Berkeley Experimental Schools Project, 1968-76

Lecture | October 18 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, O'Neill Room

 Joanne Tien, UC Berkeley

 Bancroft Library

Joanne Tien will discuss how teachers and students in the Berkeley Experimental Schools Project navigated the ideological tension between constructivist pedagogical approaches and the cultivation of explicit political values that challenge systems of oppression.

 The O'Neill Room has a maximum capacity of 28 people. The doors will be shut and no more attendees may enter once the room is at capacity.

The Screen in Sound: Toward a Theory of Listening

Lecture | October 18 | 4-6 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Rey Chow, Anne Firor Scott Professor of Literature in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences, Duke University

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies

This lecture is drawn from Rey Chow’s chapter in the anthology Sound Objects (Duke UP, forthcoming), ed. James A. Steintrager and Rey Chow. By foregrounding crucial connections among sound studies, poststructuralist theory, and contemporary acousmatic experiences, the lecture presents listening as a trans-disciplinary problematic through which different fields of study resonate in fascinating ways.

Why the Constitution? The Problem of Taxes and Slavery

Lecture | October 18 | 4-6 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, This is a webinar event.

 Robin Einhorn, Professor, Department of History

 UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project

UCBHSSP is pleased to co-sponsor with the National Humanities Center, this virtual scholar talk with the Professor Robin Einhorn of the UC Berkeley Department of History.

This webinar will examine the relevant clauses of the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution, along with extracts from and letters about the key debates in the Continental Congress, Philadelphia convention, and some...   More >

 This is a virtual event.

Transformation Of Backward Politics In India: The Case Of Uttar Pradesh

Lecture | October 18 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Gilles Verniers, Assistant Professor of Political Science and Director of the Trivedi Centre for Political Data, Ashoka University

 Institute of International Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

Electoral politics in the state of Uttar Pradesh is undergoing profound changes. A long phase of explicit caste and religion-based electoral politics has given way to inclusive political discourses and electoral strategies that have produced more diverse assemblies, in terms of caste and communities composition. At the same time, a new political class has emerged, grounded in local business...   More >

Race in Brazil: A Historical Overview

Lecture | October 18 | 6-8 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

Brazil was the site of the largest slave-based economy in the Americas and the last country in the hemisphere to abolish the institution. For most of the twentieth century, Brazil was described as a “racial democracy” – a place where clear racial categories and race-based discrimination do not exist. This presentation discusses the history of slavery, emancipation, and post-emancipation in Brazil...   More >

The Unconscious Is Structured Like a Workplace: Brainwork, Artwork and the Divided Labor of Thought in Late-Victorian Fiction

Lecture | October 18 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 330, English Department Lounge

 Emily Steinlight, Stephen M. Gorn Family Assistant Professor of English, Penn Arts & Sciences

 Department of English

This talk will find a prehistory of the contemporary problematic of the “creative economy” in two late-Victorian novels of the art world, Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray and George Du Maurier’s Trilby. Examining the relation they plot out between psychic processes and aesthetic production, it will assess how these narratives track art to unconscious sources that strangely resemble the...   More >

Friday, October 19, 2018

Why Read Montaigne’s Essays?: “Why Read…? Series”

Lecture | October 19 | 12-2 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Antónia Szabari, University of Southern California; Carla Freccero, UC Santa Cruz; Diego Pirillo, UC Berkeley; Jane O. Newman, U.C. Irvine

 Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, D.E.

Round-table and discussion

Jacobs Design Conversations: Camille Utterback

Lecture | October 19 | 12-1 p.m. | 310 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Camille Utterback, Stanford professor and internationally acclaimed artist, will speak at Jacobs Hall about her pioneering work in the field of digital and interactive art.

Integrating Shared Autonomous Fleet Services in Urban Mobility: Dynamic

Lecture | October 19 | 4 p.m. | 502 Davis Hall

 Hani S. Mahmassani, Northwestern University

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Northwestern University's Hani S. Mahmassani will present Integrating Shared Autonomous Fleet Services in Urban Mobility: Dynamic on October 19, 2018 at 4 p.m. in SPECIAL LOCATION 502 Davis Hall. Join us for cookies and beverages at 3:30 p.m.

Ancient Philosophy Workshop: Why was Socrates charged with "introducing religious innovations”?

Lecture | October 19 | 5-7 p.m. | 1229 Dwinelle Hall | Note change in location

 Kirk R. Sanders, University of Illinois

 Joint Graduate Program in Ancient Philosophy

Xenophon’s Apology and Memorabilia frequently merit little more than footnotes in the vast scholarly literature on Socrates generally, and on Socrates’ trial in particular. The present paper belongs to a larger project in which I try to build a systematic case for Xenophon – and, to a lesser extent, against Plato’s Apology – as a source for understanding the nature and motivation of the charges...   More >

Saturday, October 20, 2018

Science at Cal Lecture -A shaky anniversary: Lessons learned since the October 21, 1868 Hayward earthquake

Lecture | October 20 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Roland Bürgman, Department of Earth and Planetary Science

 Science@Cal

This lecture presented in partnership with the UC Berkeley Seismology Laboratory.

In 1868, a destructive earthquake ruptured along the Hayward fault in the Eastern Bay Area, which was then referred to as the “Great San Francisco earthquake”. It lost that name to the much larger 1906 earthquake on the San Andreas fault across the Bay.

Alamada County Courthouse in San Leandro (photo courtesy of Bancroft Library)

Members' Walk: Crops of the World

Lecture | October 20 | 1-2:30 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Join Horticulturist Jason Bonham on an in-depth exploration of the Crops of the World Garden. Food and other economically important plants in the Crops of the World Garden are arranged geographically by place of wild origin. Most of the plants featured are edibles—fruits, grains, vegetables, and herbs. A few are valuable for other purposes, such as mulberry trees as silkworm food and cork oaks as...   More >

  Register online