<< Thursday, April 18, 2019 >>

Thursday, April 18, 2019

Calcutta to California: Sowing an American Lineage of Kathak Dance with Rachna Nivas

Lecture | April 18 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Theater

 Rachna Nivas

 Arts + Design


Bancroft Library Roundtable: Cherokees and Choctaws Among the Miwok and Yokuts: Legacies of Cultural Blending and Intertribal Relations in Nineteenth Century California

Lecture | April 18 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Andrew Shaler, PhD candidate in History, UC Riverside

 Bancroft Library

The California Gold Rush is remembered for the thousands of immigrants who traversed continents and oceans for a chance to gain quick wealth. Lost in these narratives are the rich histories of Native American emigrants who made the same journey to California’s Gold Country beginning in 1849. Andrew Shaler considers the legacies of these Native emigrants.

 The Lewis-Latimer Room has a maximum capacity of 28 people. The doors will be shut and no more attendees may enter once the room is at capacity.

BIDS Data Science Lecture: Astrophysical Machine Learning

Lecture | April 18 | 2:30-3:30 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Joshua Bloom, Professor, Department of Astronomy, UC Berkeley

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

From streaming, repeated, noisy, and distorted images of the sky, time-domain astronomers are tasked with extracting novel science as quickly as possible with limited and imperfect information. Employing algorithms developed in other fields, we have has already reached important milestones demonstrating the speed and efficacy of using ML in data and ...   More >

Oxytocin-dependent reopening of a social reward learning critical period with MDMA

Lecture | April 18 | 3-4 p.m. | 3101 Berkeley Way West

 Gul Dolen MD PhD, Johns Hopkins

 Center for the Developing Adolescent

Russia 2018: The Global Potemkin Village | A Lecture by David Goldblatt

Lecture | April 18 | 4-6 p.m. |  Durham Studio Theater (Dwinelle Hall)

 David Goldblatt, Sports Writer, Broadcaster, Sociologist, Journalist and Author

 Prof. Martha Saavedra, Center for African Studies, UC Berkeley

 Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies, Department of History, Center for British Studies

David Goldblatt is a sports writer, broadcaster, sociologist, journalist and author. Among his books are The Games: A Global History of the Olympics, The Game of Our Lives: The Meaning and Making of English Football, Futebol Nation: A Footballing History of Brazil, and The Ball Is Round: A Global History of Football.

AHMA Colloquium - 3D Printed Replicas vs their Originals for the Study and Preservation of Ancient Egyptian Antiquities

Lecture | April 18 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 308A Doe Library

 Rita Lucarelli, UC Berkeley

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

This paper is part of a larger lecture series entitled "Digital Humanities and the Ancient World." The series is co-sponsored by the Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology (AHMA) Colloquium and the Townsend Center for the Humanities.

Diversity and Power in Global Christian Communities

Lecture | April 18 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 691 Barrows Hall

 Center for Race and Gender

Candace Lukasik, PhD Candidate in Anthropology

Hannah Waits, PhD Candidate in American History

Mathematics Department Colloquium/Serge Lang Undergraduate Lecture: Distinguishing shapes via topology

Lecture | April 18 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 60 Evans Hall

 Helene Barcelo, MSRI

 Department of Mathematics

Topologists will say that a coffee cup is like a donut. What do they mean? Homotopy and Homology are invariants created to distinguish basic geometric structures. In this talk I will briefly talk about the history of such invariants and describe new ones that are also applicable to discrete structures like graphs.

Michael Cook: "Muslim Sectarianism: Past and Present"

Lecture | April 18 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Dr. Michael Cook, Princeton University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Near Eastern Studies, Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Michael Cook, Class of 1946 Professor of Near Eastern Studies
Princeton University

“ ‘Global Mission’: Nazi Foreign Cultural Policy and the Goethe Society in Weimar”

Lecture | April 18 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Department of German

Bio:
W. Daniel Wilson was professor of German at Berkeley from 1983 to 2005 and departmental chair for four years; he is now professor of German at Royal Holloway, University of London. He has published widely in eighteenth-century literature, culture, and politics, particularly on political, gender and sexuality in Goethe. His most recent books are Goethe Männer Knaben: Ansichten zur...   More >

Ayahuasca Shamanism: Illuminating the Interface between Biology, Emotion and Spirituality

Lecture | April 18 | 6-7:30 p.m. | LeConte Hall, Room 4 | Note change in location

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

Drawing from his first hand experience at Nihue Rao Centro Espiritual, a traditional healing center near Iquitos, in the Peruvian Amazon; Dr. Tafur will review the role of spiritual and emotional healing in modern healthcare. He will discuss how emotional trauma contributes to medical illness, and how spiritual healing techniques can lead to improvements in the mind-body. Ayahuasca shamanism and...   More >

BERC and ISAS present: How Clean Energy Can Boost Incomes in the Global South

Lecture | April 18 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Haas School of Business, Chou Hall N440+N444

 Berkeley Energy and Resources Collaborative, Institute for South Asia Studies

Over the last decade, clean energy innovations have transformed access to electricity and lighting for millions in the global south, but with little economic impact. However, with wide deployment throughout India, solar irrigation pumps have been the exception, improving productivity, product value, reducing inputs costs and improving the economic situation of farmers.

Abhishek Jain from CEEP...   More >

AIA Lecture - The Harbour Landscape of Ephesos

Lecture | April 18 | 7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall | Note change in time

 Sabine Ladstätter, Director of the Ephesus Excavations

 Archaeological Institute of America, the San Francisco Society

The geographical location of Ephesos is favorable, but throughout history the continuous shifting of the shoreline from the east to the west created some difficulties and resulted in the movement of the settlements. Since the beginning of research in Ephesos, in the late 19th century, the importance of a connection to the sea and the existence of functioning harbors for the settlement activity in...   More >