<< Monday, March 18, 2019 >>

Monday, March 18, 2019

Civil and Environmental Engineering Department Seminar: Granular Mechanics: Soil, Additive Manufacturing, and Beyond

Seminar | March 18 | 10-11 a.m. | 542 Davis Hall

 Michelle Bernhardt-Barry

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

The advent of additive manufacturing (AM) has opened many new fields of study related to multi-scale granular material behavior and it has the potential to transform the way in which we design and construct geotechnical infrastructure. This talk will highlight several areas of ongoing research within Dr. Bernhardt-Barry’s group and opportunities for expanding this research in the future. The...   More >

EH&S 403 Training Session

Course | March 18 | 10:30-11:30 a.m. | 370 University Hall | Note change in date

 Jason Smith, UC Berkeley Office of Environment, Health, & Safety

 Office of Environment, Health & Safety

This session briefly covers the UC Berkeley specific radiation safety information you will need to start work.​ In addition, dosimeter will be issued, if required.

Workspace for Working on Your Human Subjects Protocol

Workshop | March 18 | 11 a.m.-1 p.m. | 2414 Dwinelle Hall

 Leah Carroll, UC Berkeley Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

 UC Berkeley Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

Come work on your human subjects protocol in a space where others are doing the same, and one representative of the Haas Scholars or SURF program will be present to answer questions and guide you.

Adaptive changes in the adult visual system following visual deprivation

Seminar | March 18 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall

 Dr. MiYoung Kwon, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

As our population ages, a growing number of people must adapt to normal and pathological aging processes. Thus, understanding how the adult human brain deals with degraded sensory input is increasingly important. In this talk, I will present behavioral and brain-imaging evidence suggesting that visual deprivation results in compensatory changes in the adult human visual system. Here I will...   More >

STROBE Seminar: 3D Phase Contrast Tomography with Atomic Resolution

Seminar | March 18 | 12-1 p.m. | 775A Tan Hall

 David Ren, Waller Group, UC Berkeley

 College of Chemistry

Electron tomography is a technique used in both materials science and structural biology to image features well below optical resolution limit. In this work, we present a new algorithm for reconstructing the three-dimensional(3D) electrostatic potential of a sample at atomic resolution from phase contrast imaging using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Our method accounts for...   More >

Leveraging Science to Improve the Lives of Children and Adolescents: IHD/Developmental Colloquium featuring a cross-disciplinary discussion

Colloquium | March 18 | 12-1 p.m. | 1102 Berkeley Way West

 Institute of Human Development

There has been a great deal of progress in the scientific understanding of how children learn and develop—and the social contexts, conditions, and systems that can promote health, well-being, learning, and social success. There are many challenges to leveraging this science for real-world impact. Yet, there are also exciting opportunities—and compelling reasons for overcoming these
challenges.

Leveraging Science to Improve the Lives of Children and Adolescents: A cross-disciplinary discussion

Panel Discussion | March 18 | 12-1 p.m. | 1102 Berkeley Way West

 Prudence Carter, Dean, Graduate School of Education; Jill Duerr Berrick, Professor, School of Social Welfare; Lia Fernald, Professor, School of Public Health; Jason Okonofua, Professor, Department of Psychology

 Ron Dahl, Director, Institute of Human Development

 Institute of Human Development

There has been a great deal of progress in the scientific understanding of how children learn and develop—and the social contexts, conditions, and systems that can promote health, well-being, learning, and social success. There are many challenges to leveraging this science for real-world impact. Yet, there are also exciting opportunities—and compelling reasons for overcoming these challenges.

Combinatorics Seminar: Cone valuations, Gram's relation, and combinatorics

Seminar | March 18 | 12:10-1 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Raman Sanyal, Goethe Universitat-Frankfurt and Simons Institute

 Department of Mathematics

The Euler-Poincare formula is a cornerstone of the combinatorial theory of polytopes. It states that the number of faces of various dimensions of a convex polytope satisfy a linear relation and it is the only linear relation (up to scaling). Gram’s relation generalizes the fact that the sum of (interior) angles at the vertices of a convex $n$-gon is $(n-2)\pi$. In dimensions $3$ and up, it is...   More >

Political Economy Seminar: “Diversity in Schools: Immigrants and the Educational Performance of Natives”

Seminar | March 18 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Paola Giuliano, UCLA

 Department of Economics

The Political Economy Seminar focuses on formal and quantitative work in the political economy field, including formal political theory.

String-Math Seminar: A Sheaf-Theoretic model for \(SL(2,\mathbb C)\) Floer homology

Seminar | March 18 | 2-3 p.m. | 402 LeConte Hall

 Mohammed Abouzaid, Columbia University

 Department of Mathematics

I will describe joint work with Ciprian Manolescu on constructing an analogue of instanton Floer homology replacing the group \(SU(2)\) by \(SL(2,\mathbb C)\). Having failed to do so using the standard Floer theoretic tools of gauge theory and symplectic topology, we turned to sheaf theory to produce an invariant. After describing our approach, I will discuss some features of this theory that are...   More >

Seminar 231, Public Finance

Seminar | March 18 | 2-4 p.m. | 597 Evans Hall

 Johannes Kasinger; Dario Tortarolo

 Robert D. Burch Center for Tax Policy and Public Finance

Johannes Kasinger - "Simplifying Information and Retirement Planning Disparities"

Dario Tortarolo - "Earnings responses to large income tax changes"

Special Quantum Geometry Seminar: Matrix algebras, geometry and particle physics

Seminar | March 18 | 2:10-4 p.m. | 736 Evans Hall

 Andrzej Sitarz, Jagiellonian University, Krakow

 Department of Mathematics

Starting from the description of the Standard Model of particle physics based on noncommutative geometry we study the properties of the matrix algebras in the model. We demonstrate that there exists a new previously unknown geometric feature of the model, which can be mathematically stated that the Hilbert space of particles is a self-Morita equivalence bimodule for the associated generalization...   More >

Workspace for Working on Your Human Subjects Protocol

Workshop | March 18 | 3-5 p.m. | 2414 Dwinelle Hall

 Leah Carroll, UC Berkeley Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

 UC Berkeley Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

Come work on your human subjects protocol in a space where others are doing the same, and one representative of the Haas Scholars or SURF program will be present to answer questions and guide you.

Arithmetic Geometry and Number Theory RTG Seminar: Bounding 5-torsion in class groups using Elliptic Curves

Seminar | March 18 | 3-5 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall

 Jacob Tsimerman, University of Toronto

 Department of Mathematics

We discuss a new method to bound 5-torsion in class groups using elliptic curves. The most natural “trivial” bound on the n-torsion is to bound it by the size of the entire class group, for which one has a global class number formula. We explain how to make sense of the n-torsion of a class group intrinsically as a “dimension 0 selmer group”, and by embedding it into an appropriate...   More >

Evidence for the Suffixing Preference

Colloquium | March 18 | 3:10-5 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Matthew S. Dryer, Professor of Linguistics, University at Buffalo

 Department of Linguistics

It might be thought that there already exists overwhelming evidence for a preference for suffixes over prefixes. However, strictly speaking, most of the available evidence is evidence for an orthographic suffixing preference, i.e. a preference for suffixes over prefixes in the orthographic representations of words in grammatical descriptions. Haspelmath (2011), however, questions how reliable...   More >

Differential Geometry Seminar: On the large time collapsing of Ricci flows

Seminar | March 18 | 3:10-4 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Shaosai Huang, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 Department of Mathematics

In contrast to finite time singularities of Ricci flows, it is known that collapsing with bounded sectional curvature may occur as we approach time infinity along immortal Ricci flows. In this talk I will show that along an immortal Ricci flow with uniformly bounded diameter and sectional curvature, an unbounded sequence of time slices sub converges to a Ricci flat orbifold.

Jeffrey Linderoth – Perspectives on Integer Programming in Sparse Optimization

Seminar | March 18 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 1174 Etcheverry Hall

 Jeffrey Linderoth, University of Wisconsin - Madison

 Industrial Engineering & Operations Research

Abstract: Algorithms to solve mixed integer linear programs have made incredible progress in the past 20 years. Key to these advances has been a mathematical analysis of the structure of the set of feasible solutions. We argue that a similar analysis is required in the case of mixed integer quadratic programs, like those that arise in sparse optimization in machine learning. One such analysis...   More >

IB Finishing Talk: Tropical plant hydraulics in a changing world

Seminar | March 18 | 4-5 p.m. | 2040 Valley Life Sciences Building

 Clarissa Fontes, UCB (Dawson Lab)

 Department of Integrative Biology

Seminar 271, Development: "Consumption Insurance and Technology Adoption"

Seminar | March 18 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 648 Evans Hall

 Melanie Morten, Stanford University

 Department of Economics

Quantitative analysis of energy metabolism: Dr. Sheng Hui, Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University

Seminar | March 18 | 4-5 p.m. | 101 Morgan Hall

 Center for Computational Biology, Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology

Abstract:
Mammals generate energy by burning dietary carbon into CO2. The largest calorie source for most mammals is carbohydrate, which is broken down into glucose in the small intestinal lumen. Glucose is then absorbed and circulates in the blood stream. To acquire energy, tissues are generally assumed to take in glucose and break it down to CO2 through the concerted action of glycolysis and...   More >

Seminar 208, Microeconomic Theory: Secure Survey Design in Organizations: Theory and Experiments

Seminar | March 18 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 639 Evans Hall

 Sylvain Chassang, NYU

 Department of Economics

"Three-Dimensional Chess": Dissecting the Political, Economic, and Military Layers of US-PRC-ROC Relations in 2019

Colloquium | March 18 | 5-7 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Yukon Huang, Senior Fellow, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace Asia Program; T.J. Pempel, Jack M. Forcey Professor of Political Science, UC Berkeley

 Brian Tsui and Tim Smith, on behalf of Strait Talk at UC Berkeley

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

In the past six months, relations between the United States, the People’s Republic of China, and the Republic of China have been subject to significant tensions. President Trump escalated US military ties with the ROC...   More >

Perspectives on the Iranian Revolution: Commemorating 40 Years

Colloquium | March 18 | 5-8 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Join Perspective Magazine, a student-run publication printed on a bi-annual basis, to celebrate the launch of their spring issue and commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Iranian Revolution.
Perspective offers the Iranian-American diaspora and anyone interested in Iran an outlet to explore the Iranian culture and key issues affecting the Iranian community.

Forty years later, we invite...   More >

On Digital Colonialism and “Other” Futures with Morehshin Allahyari

Presentation | March 18 | 6:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Media artist, activist, educator, and curator Morehshin Allahyari will discuss some of her projects focused on topics such as 3D fabrication, activism, digital colonialism, monstrosity, and fabulation. She will use this talk as a platform to show the possibilities of art making beyond aesthetics or visualization, positing and contextualizing a “position outside” that asks difficult questions and...   More >