<< Wednesday, February 08, 2017 >>

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Asphalt Pavement Materials, Design, Construction and Maintenance

Workshop | February 7 – 9, 2017 every day | 8 a.m.-5 p.m. | Courtyard Marriott Monrovia, Monterey Room

 700 West Huntington Drive, Monrovia, CA 91016

 James Sigore, American Society of Civil Engineers; Irwin Guada, UC Pavement Research Center; Frank Farshidi, City of San Jose

 Technology Transfer Program

This three-day course is aimed at covering the full range of topics related to asphalt concrete pavements from materials and mix design to construction, maintenance, and rehabilitation. Asphalt concrete pavements are a vital part of an agency's assets and constitute about 90% of the local streets in California. The numerous topics in this class will be presented in sufficient detail to assist the...   More >

 This course is particularly designed for junior-level engineers in state and local agencies and those new to the pavement field who would benefit from a strong introduction to asphalt pavements. More senior level agency engineers, consultants, contractors

Caltime KRONOS 8 – Time Keeper Training

Course | February 8 | 9 a.m.-12 p.m. | 241 CSS

 1608 Fourth Street, Berkeley, CA 94710

 Lydia Jenkins

 Human Resources

Objective/Focus - KRONOS 8 Changes:
Cosmetic features and functionality of CalTime KRONOS 8
Access to CalTime via Citrix – one timecard view
Historical Edits
Step by step run reports process
View Accruals and totals for employee timecards
Individual and mass timecard approval
Icons, and color alerts to guide to the next task
Instructor-led, hands-on training using Caltime training...   More >

  Register online

RADPD - Foundational - PD1 Basic Budget Development

Course | February 8 | 9 a.m.-4 p.m. | University Hall, Room 24

 Human Resources

Synopsis: An Excel-based workshop that guides participants through how to create a proposal budget and narrative justification that is compliant with sponsor restrictions and consistent with University HR policies.

  Register online

Matrix Computations and Scientific Computing Seminar: Fiedler and almost-tridiagonal matrices

Seminar | February 8 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 380 Soda Hall

 Beresford Parlett, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

We begin with Fiedler's 2003 paper in which he introduced his new 5-diagonal companion matrix. Then we review a few diverse topics that introduce special interesting matrices: CMV,banded with banded inverse, and quasi-separable. We show the connecting link and note that all of the forms are invariant under the LR transform.

MVZ LUNCH SEMINAR: Frédéric (Fred) Delsuc "Molecular phylogenetic studies of living and extinct xenarthran mammals"

Seminar | February 8 | 12-1 p.m. | 3101 Valley Life Sciences Building

 Frédéric (Fred) Delsuc

 Museum of Vertebrate Zoology

MVZ Lunch is a graduate level seminar series (IB264) based on current and recent vertebrate research. Professors, graduate students, staff, and visiting researchers present on current and past research projects. The seminar meets every Wednesday from 12- 1pm in the Grinnell-Miller Library. Enter through the MVZ's Main Office, 3101 Valley Life Sciences Building, and please let the receptionist...   More >

Plant and Microbial Biology Micro Seminar: "Lanthanides: drivers of one-carbon cycling and more?"

Seminar | February 8 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 Barker Hall

 Mary Lidstrom, University of Washington

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

Dr. Lidstrom is a Professor of Microbiology and holds the Frank Jungers Chair of Engineering, in the Department of Chemical Engineering, at the University of Washington, Seattle. She received her B.S. in Microbiology from Oregon State University. After receiving her M.S. and Ph.D. in Bacteriology from the University of Wisconsin, Dr. Lidstrom conducted work as a Leverhulme postdoctoral Fellow in...   More >

Mary Lidstrom

MS4A proteins as chemosensors in olfaction and microglia

Seminar | February 8 | 12-1 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center

 **Paul Greer**, Harvard University

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

BioE Seminar: “Remodeling of cell surfaceome proteomes in cancer”

Seminar | February 8 | 12-1 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Jim Wells, UCSF

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Spring 2017 Seminar Series
Wednesday, February 8
12noon - 1:00pm
290 Hearst Mining Building

Jim Wells
Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry
UCSF

A planning game reveals distributed patterning in player behavior

Seminar | February 8 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall

 Gautam Agarwal, Champalimaud Neuroscience Program, Portugal

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Decision-making has been modeled in great detail based on 2-alternative choice (2AC) tasks; however it remains unclear how these models apply to more naturalistic settings, where choices can have long-term and diverse consequences. In turn, quantitatively modeling more complex decisions poses a challenge, requiring adequate sampling of behavior over a larger state space. To address this problem,...   More >

Tips and Tools for Improving Your Sleep (BEUHS050)

Workshop | February 8 | 12:10-1 p.m. | Tang Center, University Health Services, Section Club

 Dana Walsh, MFT, CEAP, Employee Assistance, Be well at Work - Employee Assistance

 Be Well at Work - Employee Assistance

This workshop will explore the importance of sleep for our biological and psychological functioning, and how lack of sleep may impact our health. It will explore the evolutionary explanations behind sleep, the biology of sleep, including circadian rhythms and sleep cycles, and its necessity for survival, while providing basic tips and tools to help improve the overall quality of your sleep,...   More >

  Register online

Choosing Empathy

Colloquium | February 8 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Jamil Zaki, Assistant Professor, Stanford University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Empathy--people's ability to share and understand each other's emotions--is a powerful social force, but can collapse when it is most needed, for instance during intergroup conflicts. Many theories of empathy hold that it occurs automatically, something like an emotional reflex. If this is the case, then its limits might be unavoidable. In this talk, I will lay out an alternative account, under...   More >

Caltime KRONOS 8 – Time Keeper Training

Course | February 8 | 1-4 p.m. | 241 CSS

 1608 Fourth Street, Berkeley, CA 94710

 Lydia Jenkins

 Human Resources

Objective/Focus - KRONOS 8 Changes:
Cosmetic features and functionality of CalTime KRONOS 8
Access to CalTime via Citrix – one timecard view
Historical Edits
Step by step run reports process
View Accruals and totals for employee timecards
Individual and mass timecard approval
Icons, and color alerts to guide to the next task
Instructor-led, hands-on training using Caltime training...   More >

  Register online

BLISS Seminar: Semantic security versus active adversaries

Seminar | February 8 | 2-3 p.m. | 400 Cory Hall

 Ziv Goldfeld, Ben-Gurion University

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

Physical Layer Security (PLS) guarantees protection against computationally-unlimited eavesdroppers without using a key. These guarantees come at the price of an unrealistic assumption that the eavesdropper's channel is fully known to the legitimate parties...   More >

Topology Seminar (Introductory Talk): Heegaard Floer homology in Contact Geometry

Seminar | February 8 | 2:10-3 p.m. | 736 Evans Hall

 James Conway, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

Contact 3-manifolds come in two main flavours: tight and overtwisted. Suppose we are given a contact 3-manifold $(M, \xi )$: what tools can we use to show that it is tight? I will describe two tools – Heegaard Floer homology and open book decompositions – and how they have been used (together) to give contact invariants to help answer this question. In particular, we will see how Heegaard...   More >

Human Brain Imaging with fMRI

Colloquium | February 8 | 3 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Ida Momennejad

 Department of Psychology

Hyperfinite Markov Processes

Seminar | February 8 | 3:10-4 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Haosui Duanmu, Haosui Duanmu, Department of Statistics, University of Toronto,

 Department of Statistics

I will start by giving a short introduction on Nonstandard Analysis and Nonstandard Probability Theory. Then I will introduce the concept of Hyperfinite Markov processes.

Molecular clocks of human evolution

Seminar | February 8 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center

 **Priya Moorjani**, Columbia University

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Bedload transport and hyporheic flow in a regulated, gravel bed river: Observations and implications for salmon spawning habitat

Colloquium | February 8 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 575 McCone Hall

 Dr. Erin Bray, Professor, University of California, Santa Barbara

 Department of Geography

Applied Math Seminar: Twisted X-rays, orbital angular momentum and the determination of atomic structure

Seminar | February 8 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Richard James, University of Minnesota

 Department of Mathematics

After a general introduction to our work on “objective structures”, we focus on Maxwell’s equations. We find solutions of Maxwell’s equations that are the precise analog of plane waves, but in the case that the translation group is replaced by the (largest) Abelian helical group. These waves display constructive/destructive interference with helical atomic structures, in the same way that...   More >

Seminar: Molecular clocks of human evolution - Dr. Priya Moorjani, Columbia Univeristy

Seminar | February 8 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center

 Center for Computational Biology

Molecular clocks of human evolution

Abstract: One of the most fundamental discoveries in evolutionary biology is the “molecular clock”: the observation that changes to the genome due to mutation and recombination occur steadily with time. Thus, the accumulation of neutral substitutions (i.e., changes with no fitness effects) over generations provides a record of the time elapsed and hence an...   More >

ERG Colloquium: Andrew Light: The Road from the Paris Climate Agreement

Colloquium | February 8 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 126 Barrows Hall

 Andrew Light, Director of the Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy, George Mason University

 Energy and Resources Group

In December 2015, over 190 countries met in Paris for the 21st meeting of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change where they succeeded in creating a new international climate agreement. Many have heralded the outcome as a groundbreaking achievement for international diplomacy and global climate action. Others have argued that the climate commitments that parties brought to the...   More >

EECS Colloquium: Taking Computing+Data Wide Across the Curriculum: The Illinois CS+X and MCS-DS Degree Programs

Colloquium | February 8 | 4-5 p.m. | Soda Hall, 306 (HP Auditorium)

 Rob A. Rutenbar, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

Computer Science has become the most popular major and largest teaching unit on many campuses. (Statistics is seeing a similar exponential growth in demand, reflecting the rise of Data Science.) This is focusing welcome attention on CS curriculum design: what do we teach, and to whom. The first response to “rising- tide” demand is to go “deep”: more majors, more courses, more classroom seats,...   More >

Topology Seminar (Main Talk): Tight Contact Structures via Admissible Transverse Surgery

Seminar | February 8 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 3 Evans Hall

 James Conway, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

Suppose $K$ is a fibred knot in a 3-manifold $M$ giving an open book decomposition of $M$, and that the supported contact structure $\xi _K$ on $M$ is overtwisted. Under what conditions does negative surgeries on $K$ (considered as a transverse knot in $(M, \xi _K)$) result in a tight contact manifold?

This problem becomes tractable when we strengthen the requirements of the surgered manifold to...   More >

Rabih Alameddine on "The Angel of History"

Workshop | February 8 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Rabih Alameddine

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Near Eastern Studies, Department of English, Center for Race and Gender

Rabih Alameddine is the author of six novels--including the National Book Award finalist An Unnecessary Woman and the international bestseller The Hakawati--as well as a Twitter feed that The New Yorker called "a work of art." His most recent novel, The Angel of History, follows Yemeni-born poet Jacob as he reckons with his childhood in an Egyptian brothel, the AIDS crisis in San Francisco,...   More >