Critic’s choice

It’s all happening at Berkeley

Mark Morris Dance Group / Pepperland: Sgt. Pepper at 50
Critic’s choice
Sunday 10/21
Wednesday 10/24
Friday 11/2
Wednesday 11/7
Fri. 11/9 – 11/10
Saturday 2/2
Saturday 4/13

Film: The Leopard

Sunday, October 21 | 7-10 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Director Luchino Visconti integrates a family history into a panoramic account of the Risorgimento; revolution informs the most intimate relationships between the aristocrat Fabrizio (Burt Lancaster), his radical nephew Tancredi (Alain Delon), and Angelica (Claudia Cardinale), whose marriage to Tancredi signals the symbolic merging of the classes.MORE about <em>The Leopard</em>

The Leopard

Panel Discussion: Is a Habitable Climate a Human Right? Juliana v. the United States

Tuesday, October 23 | 12:45-2 p.m. | 110 Boalt Hall, School of Law
In the case of Juliana vs. the United States slated to be heard in U.S. District Court this month, 21 youth plaintiffs assert that “through the government’s affirmative actions that cause climate change, it has violated the youngest generation’s constitutional rights to life, liberty and property…and failed to protect essential public trust resources.”
A discussion with Kelly Matheson, Jordan Diamond, Sharon Duggan et al: Can litigation and advocacy protect the vulnerable peoples of the world where democracy and politics have failed? MORE about Is a Habitable Climate a Human Right? Juliana v. the United States

Lecture: Optimal Robot Action for and around People with

Tuesday, October 23 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 190 Doe Library
Estimation, planning, control and learning are giving us robots that can generate good behavior given a specified objective and set of constraints. Anca Dragan explores how humans enter this behavior-generation picture, and study two complementary challenges: 1) how to optimize behavior when the robot is not acting in isolation, but needs to coordinate or collaborate with people; and 2) what to optimize in order to get the behavior we want.MORE about Optimal Robot Action for and around People with

Panel Discussion: Indivisible Tohono O'odham — Indigenous Organizing in the Southwest

Tuesday, October 23 | 1-2:30 p.m. | 554 Barrows Hall
Bifurcated by the border since the Gadsden Purchase in 1854, the Tohono Oodham (TO) have fought for medical treatment, citizenship status, and border crossing privileges for both "parts" of the community. Building off of that legacy of TO activism around the U.S.-Mexico Border is the contemporary group, Indivisible Tohono O'odham and their work interrogating the limits of indigeneity, citizenship, and the spatiality of the so-called "Nations within."MORE about Indivisible Tohono O'odham — Indigenous Organizing in the Southwest

Film: Persona

Wednesday, October 24 | 3:10-4:40 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Ingmar Bergman’s masterpiece chronicles an actress named Elizabeth (Liv Ullmann) who elects to become silent and is put into the care of Alma (Bibi Andersson), a nurse companion. By the end of the film, the two characters are engaged in a desperate Strindberg-like duel of identities, and Bergman has turned that struggle into a metaphor for the fate of language, art, and consciousness itself.MORE about <em>Persona</em>

Colloquium: The Chosen Ones: Black Men and the Politics of Redemption

Wednesday, October 24 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 117, Academic Innovation Studio Dwinelle Hall
The discussion will be based on Nikki Jones's new book, The Chosen Ones: Black Men and the Politics of Redemption, which centers on the struggles faced by formerly incarcerated black men trying to fit back into their communities and the obstacles they face when attempting to integrate into greater society.MORE about The Chosen Ones: Black Men and the Politics of Redemption

Colloquium: Computational Complexity in Theory and in Practice with Richard Karp

Wednesday, October 24 | 4-5 p.m. | 306 (HP Auditorium) Soda Hall
Richard Karp received the Turing Award in 1985 and the National Medal of Science in 1996. He will discuss computational complexity theory and approaches to several canonical problems: satisfiability solving, linear programming, integer programming, the traveling-salesman problem, bin packing, matching and number partitioning.MORE about Computational Complexity in Theory and in Practice with Richard Karp

Lecture: Picturing Identity: Contemporary American Autobiography in Image and Text, Hertha Sweet Wong

Wednesday, October 24 | 12-1 p.m. | Geballe Room Stephens Hall
In Picturing Identity, Hertha Sweet Wong explores the intersection of writing and visual art in the autobiographical work of Art Spiegelman, Faith Ringgold, Leslie Marmon Silko, and other American writers-artists who experiment with hybrid forms of self-narration.MORE about Picturing Identity: Contemporary American Autobiography in Image and Text, Hertha Sweet Wong

Lecture: From the Accelerating Universe to Accelerating Science

Wednesday, October 24 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center
Twenty years ago, astronomers were astonished to learn from observations of exploding stars that cosmic expansion is speeding up, attributed to dark energy. Scientists are working to learn more about its nature, and Professor Robert P. Kirshner will summarize the present state of knowledge and look ahead to new ways to use infrared observations of supernovae to improve understanding. MORE about From the Accelerating Universe to Accelerating Science

Panel Discussion: Getting the Facts on Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment

Thursday, October 25 | 4-6 p.m. | 820 Barrows Hall
Join a panel discussion and Q&A focused on the limits of what can be learned about sexual violence and harassment from personal narratives that are shared online, as well as the question of what is missed in survey data related to sexual violence and harassment. Panelists include Laura Nelson, Edward Wasserman, Lisa García Bedolla, Aya de Leon and Billy Curtis.MORE about Getting the Facts on Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment

Lecture: Anatomy of a Genocide — The Life and Death of a Town Called Buczacz

Thursday, October 25 | 5:15-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall
For more than 400 years, the Eastern European border town of Buczacz was home to a highly diverse citizenry. Then came World War II, and three years later the entire Jewish population had been murdered by German and Ukrainian police, while Ukrainian nationalists eradicated Polish residents. Professor Omer Bartov will explain how ethnic cleansing doesn’t occur as is so often portrayed in popular history, with the quick ascent of a vitriolic political leader and the unleashing of military might. It begins in seeming peace, slowly and often unnoticed.MORE about Anatomy of a Genocide — The Life and Death of a Town Called Buczacz

Reading: Berkeley Writers at Work — Edward Frenkel

Thursday, October 25 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Morrison Library, 101 Doe Library Doe Library
Edward Frenkel, professor of mathematics, will read from his work, be interviewed about his writing process, and answer questions from the audience. Frenkel is the author of The New York Times bestseller and award-winning book Love and Math, which weaves his personal and academic journey from the Soviet Union to Harvard and then Berkeley with a profound appreciation for the beauty and wonder of mathematics.MORE about Berkeley Writers at Work — Edward Frenkel

Edward Frenkel

Seminar: Complexity and Security — Managing the Tradeoffs

Thursday, October 25 | 12-1 p.m. | 205 South Hall
As part of the Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity's Lunch Seminar Series, Dr. Herb Lin explores how current trends in technology innovation suggest that societal demands for increased functionality conflict with the imperatives of robust cybersecurity. Articulating the nature of this tradeoff is a useful first step, but an understanding of how to manage that tradeoff in a systematic and disciplined manner remains elusive. A light lunch will be served. RSVP to attend.MORE about Complexity and Security — Managing the Tradeoffs

Conference: 2018 Human Rights Fellowship Conference

Friday, October 26 | 12-5 p.m. | 215 Boalt Hall, School of Law
The Human Rights Centers' 2018 Fellows have returned from their summer fieldwork and will discuss pressing human rights topics at the annual Human Rights Fellowship Conference. Enjoy brief TED-style talks and panel discussions related to racial injustice and the death penalty, child labor, the mental health effects of separating families at the U.S./Mexico border as well as inspirational lessons from human rights defenders and survivors around the world.MORE about 2018 Human Rights Fellowship Conference

Panel Discussion: Allan deSouza — How Art Can Be Thought

Friday, October 26 | 5-7 p.m. | Rm. 120 Kroeber Hall | Note change in location
A public conversation around Professor Allan deSouza's newest publication, "How Art Can Be Thought: A Handbook for Change," exploring ideas such as: What terms do we use to describe and evaluate art, and how do we judge if art is good, and if it is for the social good?MORE about Allan deSouza — How Art Can Be Thought

Panel Discussion: Bay Area Conversations — The Arts of South Asia and its Diasporas

Friday, October 26 | 9:30 a.m.-4:45 p.m. | 10 (ISAS Conf. Room) Stephens Hall
Join in a day of conversations at the Institute for South Asia Studies with art historians, curators, and artists in the Bay Area. The day-long symposium will end with a public conversation around Professor Allan deSouza’s forthcoming book How Art Can Be Thought: A Handbook for Change.MORE about Bay Area Conversations — The Arts of South Asia and its Diasporas

Allan deSouza, Borough Boogie Woogie

Colloquium: Family Separations: Beyond Violence Histories to Building Belonging

Friday, October 26 | 12-2 p.m. | Banatao Auditorium Sutardja Dai Hall
This event will present diverse perspectives on the political, legal, social, economic, and health impacts of historic and current family separations in U.S. immigration and incarceration systems, and will identify and discuss alternative strategies to advocating for inclusive policy in order to advance belonging and build community. With Angie Junck, supervising attorney at the Immigrant Legal Resource Center; Ericka Huggins is a human rights activist, poet, educator; and Heide Castañeda, associate professor of anthropology at University of South Florida Research.MORE about Family Separations: Beyond Violence Histories to Building Belonging

Theater: Barber Shop Chronicles

Friday, October 26 | 8-10 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall
Barber Shop Chronicles, created by Nigerian-born, UK-based poet and playwright Inua Ellams, explores the diversity of black male identity through the rituals and verbal banter of the urban barbershop. The cast riffs on topics both personal and political as we eavesdrop on conversations in six different barbershops over the course of a single day. Continues Oct. 27-28.MORE about <em>Barber Shop Chronicles</em>

Barber Shop Chronicles

Theater: Barber Shop Chronicles

Saturday, October 27 | 8-10 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall
Barber Shop Chronicles, created by Nigerian-born, UK-based poet and playwright Inua Ellams, explores the diversity of black male identity through the rituals and verbal banter of the urban barbershop. The cast riffs on topics both personal and political as we eavesdrop on conversations in six different barbershops over the course of a single day. Continues Oct. 28.MORE about <em>Barber Shop Chronicles</em>

Theater: Leila's Quest for Flight

Saturday, October 27 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | Hearst Museum of Anthropology
Written and directed by Torange Yeghiazarian, Leila’s Quest for Flight is drawn from Palestinian folktales. When an optometrist shatters little Leila’s dream of becoming a pilot, a menagerie of mythic birds gather to help her accomplish her goal. 30-minute performance is followed by 20-minute Q&A session with the cast.MORE about <em>Leila's Quest for Flight</em>

Leila's Quest for Flight

Presentation: Trees and Tones — Wooden Instrument Traditions - African Blackwood

Sunday, October 28 | 4-6:30 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden
Learn about the African Blackwood (Dalbergia melanoxylon), the tree from which flutes, oboes, clarinets and bagpipes are made. Growing almost exclusively in Tanzania and Mozambique, it is used for sculpture, medicine and more.MORE about Trees and Tones — Wooden Instrument Traditions - African Blackwood

Trees and Tones

The Blessed Ones

Sunday, October 28 | 3-4:20 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Ingmar Bergman’s first feature after abandoning 35mm film for television technology, The Blessed Ones is a tale of tortured love between a middle-aged woman and a slightly younger man, and the jealousies that arise from their outward differences and internal melancholies.MORE about

Film: Documentary Screening — "Mai '68, un étrange printemps"

Tuesday, October 30 | 4-7 p.m. | 4429 (Library of French Thought) Dwinelle Hall
Marking the 50th anniversary of May '68, this two-part documentary film offers firsthand accounts of those historic events from the individuals who were on the front lines: politicians, law enforcement officers, and others who participated in the protests on the streets of Paris.MORE about Documentary Screening — "Mai '68, un étrange printemps"

Lecture: Bernard Moses Memorial Lectures featuring Wendy Brown

Tuesday, October 30 | 4:10 p.m. | Toll Room Alumni House
Recent hard right political mobilizations in the West are commonly framed as rebellions against neoliberalism. Political theorist and professor Wendy Brown questions that framing as it identifies neoliberal reason with the aim to replace robust democracy and social justice with authoritarian liberalism, traditional morality and, of course, unregulated markets.MORE about Bernard Moses Memorial Lectures featuring Wendy Brown

Conference: Resources Roundtable — Innovation in Waste Management

Wednesday, October 31 | 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. | Anna Head Alumnae Hall (2537 Haste St.)
BERC is hosting a one-day symposium of Bay Area innovators in the waste and materials management space for sharing ideas and best practices. This event will bring together entrepreneurs, non-profit organizations, academics and hands-on practitioners in and around Berkeley to learn from each other and share their work.MORE about Resources Roundtable — Innovation in Waste Management

Panel Discussion: Utopia/Dystopia — Imagining the Future

Wednesday, October 31 | 4:30-6 p.m. | 315 (Maude Fife) Wheeler Hall
Inspired by Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, join a moderated discussion of utopian and dystopian views of the future from an array of disciplinary perspectives.MORE about Utopia/Dystopia — Imagining the Future

Colloquium: Berkeley ACM A.M. Turing Laureate Lecture — The Land Sharks are on the Squawk Box

Wednesday, October 31 | 4-5 p.m. | Banatao Auditorium Sutardja Dai Hall
This Turing Award talk intermixes a bicycle ride across America during the summer of 1988 with the design, construction and commercialization of Postgres during the late 80’s and early '90’s. Striking parallels are observed, leading to a discussion of what it takes to build a new DBMS. With Michael Stonebraker, a pioneer of database research and technology for more than a quarter of a century. MORE about Berkeley ACM A.M. Turing Laureate Lecture — The Land Sharks are on the Squawk Box

Lecture: Talking with the Trees — John Muir’s Nature Spirituality

Thursday, November 1 | 10-11:30 a.m. | UC Botanical Garden
This talk explores John Muir’s nature spirituality that endowed trees with a kind of personhood — an attitude that was often mocked and satirized in Muir’s day — and how Muir’s "language of trees" anticipates current scientific insights into the ways that trees can communicate with one another.MORE about Talking with the Trees — John Muir’s Nature Spirituality

Lecture: The Clean Energy Transition in Bangladesh — Local and Global Impacts and Opportunities, Daniel M. Kammen

Thursday, November 1 | 5-7 p.m. | Room 315, Maude Fife Room Wheeler Hall
A lecture by Distinguished Professor of Energy in the Energy and Resources Group at UC Berkeley and a former Science Envoy for the State Department, Prof. Daniel M. Kammen.MORE about The Clean Energy Transition in Bangladesh — Local and Global Impacts and Opportunities, Daniel M. Kammen

Reading: Lunch Poems — Tyehimba Jess

Thursday, November 1 | 12:10-12:50 p.m. | Morrison Library Doe Library
Lunch Poems presents poet Tyehimba Jess, author of Leadbelly and Olio, which won numerous awards including the 2017 Pulitzer Prize.MORE about Lunch Poems — Tyehimba Jess

Music: Pierre-Laurent Aimard and Tamara Stefanovich, pianos

Thursday, November 1 | 8-10 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall
Consummate French pianist Pierre-Laurent Aimard and brilliant Yugoslav-born pianist Tamara Stefanovich — partners off-stage as well as on — return with a program of exquisite contemporary works for one and two pianos.MORE about Pierre-Laurent Aimard and Tamara Stefanovich, pianos

Pierre-Laurent Aimard and Tamara Stefanovich

Lecture: Astronomy Night at UC Berkeley

Thursday, November 1 | 6:30-9:30 p.m. | 131 Campbell Hall
The final UC Berkeley Astronomy Night of the 2018 season features a talk by Dan Werthimer, the Marilyn and Watson Alberts SETI Chair and chief scientist of the Berkeley SETI Research Center, on the search for extraterrestrial life with SETI@home.MORE about Astronomy Night at UC Berkeley

Presentation: Human Rights and Victories Over Impunity and Corruption

Thursday, November 1 | 5:30-7 p.m. | 132 Boalt Hall, School of Law
Throughout Latin America, governments have used violence to eliminate opponents of their political, economic and social agendas. The speakers are clinic partners and family members of victims murdered for their human rights activism. The panelists will speak about their struggles against impunity, the relationship between legal and social justice, and the future of the human rights movement.MORE about Human Rights and Victories Over Impunity and Corruption

Film: The Blessed Ones

Friday, November 2 | 7:30-8:50 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Ingmar Bergman’s first feature after abandoning 35mm film for television technology, The Blessed Ones is a tale of tortured love between a middle-aged woman and a slightly younger man, and the jealousies that arise from their outward differences and internal melancholies.MORE about <em>The Blessed Ones</em>

Film: L’Atalante

Friday, November 2 | 7-8:30 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Jean Vigo’s only full-length feature is a poetic masterpiece on the theme of passionate love. In telling of a young barge captain and his peasant bride in their first days together on his barge, and of their separation when she sneaks off to Paris, L’Atalante surprises realism with surrealism.MORE about <em>L’Atalante</em>

Music: UC Berkeley Symphony Orchestra

November 2 – 3, 2018 every day | 8 p.m. | Hertz Concert Hall
Established in 1923, the UC Berkeley Symphony Orchestra is the oldest performing arts ensemble in the University of California system. Listen as music director David Milnes leads Sibelius's "Symphony No. 2" and Beethoven's "Symphony No. 3."MORE about UC Berkeley Symphony Orchestra

Music: Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis and special guest Jon Batiste

Saturday, November 3 | 8-10 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall
Jordi Savall returns with The Routes of Slavery (1444-1888), which unites more than two dozen musicians from 15 countries on three continents in a reverent celebration of the influence of enslaved people on the culture of the Americas and Europe. Vocalists from the United States, Mali, Colombia, and Catalonia blend with instrumentalists from Madagascar, Morocco, Europe, and West Africa, with historic readings intertwined throughout.MORE about Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis and special guest Jon Batiste

Film: The Stranger

Saturday, November 3 | 7:30-10:10 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Marcello Mastroianni stars as Meursault, Albert Camus’s archetype of alienation, a man who commits a senseless crime simply because the sun shines. While Luchino Visconti’s vision is entirely faithful to Camus’s story, it also supplies a sense of detail and context absent from the book, meticulously re-creating 1930s Algiers with a keen awareness of the fraught relations between the colonists and the colonized. MORE about <em>The Stranger</em>

Film: WR — Mysteries of the Organism

Saturday, November 3 | 5:30-6:50 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Director Dusan Makavejev brings a surreal combinatory style and radical sexual politics to a docu-fictional exploration of Wilhelm Reich and his implications for world revolution. After the screening, enjoy a Film to Table dinner at Babette, the cafe at BAMPFA. Purchase dinner tickets in advance at babettecafe.com.MORE about WR — Mysteries of the Organism

WR: Mysteries of the Organism

Presentation: Trees and Tones — Wooden Instrument Traditions - Guitars

Sunday, November 4 | 4-6:30 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden
Come learn about the global history of guitars and the many woods used to make them from local luthier John F. Mello, a classical guitar maker who will discuss how different woods impact the sounds. He’ll be partnered with a classical guitarist.MORE about Trees and Tones — Wooden Instrument Traditions - Guitars

Lecture: Todd Gitlin — The Other 1968s: Counterrevolution, Communism and Desublimation

Monday, November 5 | 6:30 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
In his exploration of a watershed political year, professor of journalism and sociology at Columbia University Todd Gitlin unearths a "thrust toward retrogression" that stands in stark contrast to the popular image of 1968 as a politically progressive moment.MORE about Todd Gitlin — The Other 1968s: Counterrevolution, Communism and Desublimation

Conference: Breakthrough Prize Symposium

Monday, November 5 | 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m. | Pauley Ballroom Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union
The Breakthrough Prize Symposium features presentations by world-class researchers working in the fields of physics, life sciences and mathematics. The symposium and panel discussion will feature current and past recipients of this prize. The schedule of speakers and presentation titles is available on the Breakthrough Prize 2019 website, and will be updated when the Breakthrough Prize Foundation announces the 2019 awardees. MORE about Breakthrough Prize Symposium

Lecture: Tales from the Front Lines of Wrangling Earth Science Data with Deb Agarwal

Tuesday, November 6 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 190 Doe Library
Building the data capabilities and products needed to help enable understanding of watershed dynamics, tropical forests, carbon flux, and soil carbon are just a few of the areas where data scientists are working. Deb Agarwal will describe the role inter-disciplinary data science is playing in helping to address these challenges.MORE about Tales from the Front Lines of Wrangling Earth Science Data with Deb Agarwal

Film: Shame

Wednesday, November 7 | 3:10-4:50 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Fleeing a civil war in their country, a couple (Max von Sydow and Liv Ullmann), both musicians, retreat to a remote island to grow fruit and cultivate their mutual love. But war overtakes them, exacting its total surrender of pride, privacy, and finally, principle. An oblique response to the escalating war in Vietnam, Shame expands Ingmar Bergman’s frame from interpersonal conflicts to political ones.MORE about <em>Shame</em>

Lecture: The Orphan Band of Springdale, Anne Nesbet

Wednesday, November 7 | 12-1 p.m. | Geballe Room Stephens Hall
Author Anne Nesbet’s historical novel for younger readers takes place during World War II in Springdale, Maine. It tells the story of eleven-year-old Gusta, who is sent to live in an orphanage run by her grandmother after her labor-organizer father is forced to flee the country.MORE about <em>The Orphan Band of Springdale</em>, Anne Nesbet

Lecture: Financial Innovation — The Convergence of Environment and Finance with Richard Sandor

Thursday, November 8 | 6:30-7:30 p.m. | Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center
American Financial Exchange's Richard Sandor will discuss programs and financial markets that have facilitated the building of institutions for the minimization of transactional costs to achieve better air quality. He will also discuss new frontiers and opportunities in areas such as water quality and quantity; and the application of new technologies such as blockchain to environmental markets.MORE about Financial Innovation — The Convergence of Environment and Finance with Richard Sandor

Film: The Treasure

Thursday, November 8 | 7:30-9 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Conceived as a documentary, The Treasure became a disarming deadpan parable unearthing layers of Romanian history via the exploits of cash-strapped neighbors. MORE about <em>The Treasure</em>

Lecture: Shaping a 21st Century Workforce – Is AI Friend or Foe? With Jennifer Granholm

Friday, November 9 | 4:10 p.m. | Chevron Auditorium International House
Jennifer Granholm will present the Weinstock lecture titled "Shaping a 21st Century Workforce – Is AI Friend or Foe?" The lecture is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.
MORE about Shaping a 21st Century Workforce – Is AI Friend or Foe? With Jennifer Granholm

Lecture: Designs of Destruction: The Making of Monuments in the 20th Century

Friday, November 9 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 104 Wurster Hall
Lucia Allais will narrate and analyze a remarkable episode in history, drawn from her book, Designs of Destruction: The Making of Monuments in the 20th Century, which chronicles the rise of the cultural monument as a modern, global, building type between the 1930s and 1970s.MORE about Designs of Destruction: The Making of Monuments in the 20th Century

Lecture: "Future of India" by Raghuram Rajan

Friday, November 9 | 6-8 p.m. | Banatao Auditorium Sutardja Dai Hall
Raghuram Rajan, economist and former governor of the Reserve Bank of India, delivers the second lecture in this newly established lecture series on the Future of India.MORE about "Future of India" by Raghuram Rajan

Theater: Tartuffe

November 9 – 10, 2018 every day | 8-9:30 p.m. | Zellerbach Playhouse
Initially censored following its premiere in 1664, Tartuffe is a bold work that is decidedly relevant today. Set in present-day Los Angeles, Tartuffe is the story of a con man disguised as a pious spiritual leader who wheedles his way into the home of a gullible, affluent patriarch in the midst of a mid-life crisis — promptly setting the household topsy turvy. Continues through Nov. 18.MORE about Tartuffe

Tartuffe

Workshop: Hand Block Printing with Plant Dyes

Saturday, November 10 | 10 a.m.-2 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden
Hand-block-printing is a centuries-old Indian art form that originated in the Rajasthan. In this hands-on class, create a design and pattern based on basic geometric shapes, and explore printing on various materials and design and print your own scarf. All materials, tools, and instruction will be provided, including items to print.MORE about Hand Block Printing with Plant Dyes

Music: Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra

Saturday, November 10 | 3-5 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall
Nearly 20 years ago, Israeli conductor Daniel Barenboim and Palestinian scholar Edward Said founded this orchestra of Israelis and Arabs as a model for cooperation across the brutal divides of the Middle East. In doing so, they hoped to replace ignorance with education, knowledge, and understanding; to humanize the “other”; and to imagine a more hopeful future.MORE about Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra

Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra

Lecture: Environmental Justice — What Can We Do about the Disproportionate Impact of Climate Change on Low-Income Communities? With Van Jones

Tuesday, November 13 | 1:30-2:30 p.m. | Goldman Theater David Brower Center, 2150 ALLSTON WAY, SUITE 100, Berkeley
Across America, low-income and minority communities are being hit hardest by the economic and health impacts of climate change. Enjoy an afternoon with Van Jones — news commentator, author, and founder of Dream Corps — and learn how we can seek environmental justice for the country’s most vulnerable communities. Registration is recommended to attend.MORE about Environmental Justice — What Can We Do about the Disproportionate Impact of Climate Change on Low-Income Communities? With Van Jones

Lecture: Integrating Eco-Evolutionary Data from Islands to Infer Biodiversity Dynamics with Rosemary Gillespie

Tuesday, November 13 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 190 Doe Library
A central challenge in understanding the origins of biodiversity is that, while we can observe and test local ecological phenomena, we must usually infer the longer-term outcomes of these ecological forces indirectly. Rosemary Gillespie and colleagues have been developing inferential models at the interface between macroecology and population-level processes, and applying them to data from geological chronosequences that present communities of different ages.MORE about Integrating Eco-Evolutionary Data from Islands to Infer Biodiversity Dynamics with Rosemary Gillespie

Colloquium: Could It Happen Here? Canada in the Age of Trump and Brexit

Tuesday, November 13 | 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. | Moses Hall
From award-winning author Michael Adams, Could It Happen Here? draws on groundbreaking new social research to show whether Canadian society is at risk of the populist forces afflicting other parts of the world. Drawing on major social values surveys of Canadians and Americans in 2016 — as well as decades of tracking data in both countries — Adams examines our economy, institutions, and demographics to answer the question: Could it happen here?MORE about Could It Happen Here? Canada in the Age of Trump and Brexit

Lecture: Judaism — The Genealogy of a Modern Notion, Daniel Boyarin

Wednesday, November 14 | 12-1 p.m. | Geballe Room Stephens Hall
Daniel Boyarin argues that the very concept of a religion of “Judaism” is an invention of the Christian church that was adopted by Jews only with the coming of modernity and the spread of Christian languages.MORE about <em>Judaism — The Genealogy of a Modern Notion</em>, Daniel Boyarin

Tour: Trees of the UC Berkeley Campus Walk

Wednesday, November 14 | 10 a.m.-12 p.m. | Springer Gateway UC Berkeley Campus
This tour will seek out the best of Berkeley’s fall colors, visiting the most notable campus trees as a framework for the walk. Enjoy the diversity of species, and learn a bit of history about the development of the campus and stories about the people and circumstances behind the plantings, the named groves, landmarks and memorial trees. Every tree has a story.MORE about Trees of the UC Berkeley Campus Walk

Olive tree on campus

Colloquium: Game Theory in Auction and Blockchain with Andrew Yao

Wednesday, November 14 | 4-5 p.m. | Banatao Auditorium Sutardja Dai Hall
Game theory has provided a mathematical framework for addressing issues in many domains, including economics and distributed computing systems. In recent years the rise of novel commercial infrastructure, such as electronic auction (for on-line ads) and blockchain, has led to many new interdisciplinary studies involving algorithmic games. In this talk, Andrew Chi-Chih Yao will discuss some recent work from this perspective.MORE about Game Theory in Auction and Blockchain with Andrew Yao

Lecture: Is There A Light At The End Of The North Korean Nuclear Tunnel?

Thursday, November 15 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Banatao Auditorium Sutardja Dai Hall
After a disastrous and dangerous 2017, diplomatic initiatives have opened a window for resolution of the North Korean nuclear crisis. But will the Trump administration's diplomacy succeed or fail as have all attempts over the past 25 years? Siegfried S. Hecker will offer his perspective based on seven visits to North Korea and our comprehensive study of North Korea's nuclear program.MORE about Is There A Light At The End Of The North Korean Nuclear Tunnel?

Film: "Global Cinema and 1968" — Ciné-tracts

Thursday, November 15 | 7-8 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
In partnership with BAMPFA and the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the U.S., the Institute of European Studies presents a special screening of the "Ciné-tracts," a selection of experimental short films by Jean-Luc Godard, Alain Resnais, and others, created amid the strikes and protests of May 1968 in Paris.MORE about "Global Cinema and 1968" — Ciné-tracts

Panel Discussion: Winners and Losers in the 2018 Midterm Elections

Thursday, November 15 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 820 Barrows Hall
A panel of leading scholars on Congress, public opinion, and voting behavior will review the outcomes of the 2018 midterm elections, with an account of the factors producing this result. The discussion will provide competing perspectives on the implications of the elections for governance in the upcoming years — and for the shape of the 2020 presidential and congressional elections.MORE about Winners and Losers in the 2018 Midterm Elections

Dance: Compagnie Käfig, Pixel

Friday, November 16 | 8-10 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall
Compagnie Käfig merges elements of Brazilian urban dance and capoeira with hip-hop, modern dance, and circus arts. Pixel was created by founder Mourad Merzouki in collaboration with French digital production studio Adrien M/Claire B, and features the company’s 11 dancers navigating an interactive environment of light and lasers. Continues Nov. 17.MORE about Compagnie Käfig, <em>Pixel</em>

Compagnie Käfig

Lecture: Jacobs Design Conversations — Elizabeth Churchill

Friday, November 16 | 12-1 p.m. | 310 Jacobs Hall
Elizabeth Churchill, Director of User Experience at Google, will give a talk on Empowering Creators: Research & Material Design at Jacobs Hall.MORE about Jacobs Design Conversations — Elizabeth Churchill

Workshop: About:Face — A Community Quilt

Sunday, November 18 | 11 a.m.-2 p.m. | Hearst Museum of Anthropology
Guided by artist Shirin Towfiq, decorate your own quilt patches with drawings and personal messages for a bigger communal quilt that will address issues of identity and double consciousness. This workshop is held alongside the current exhibit, Face to Face: Looking at Objects That Look at You, and is free with museum admission.MORE about About:Face — A Community Quilt

Presentation: Trees and Tones - Wooden Instrument Traditions

Sunday, November 18 | 4-6:30 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden
Perhaps one of the most emblematic stories and relationships between a tree and classical music is that of the Pau – Brasil tree (Caesalpinia echinata) and its use in making violin and cello bows. Hear from retired UC Berkeley professor Zac Cande on the conservation issues around the tree. He will also be joined by Lisa Grodin, faculty member of the Crowden School.MORE about Trees and Tones - Wooden Instrument Traditions

Lecture: Creating the Future of Nuclear Energy with Rachel Slaybaugh

Tuesday, November 27 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 190 Doe Library
The nuclear energy industry is at a crossroads: Existing nuclear reactors are struggling to operate economically in some tough markets, and construction of new designs in the U.S. is slow and over budget. At the same time, interest in and development of the next generation of nuclear reactors is growing at an unprecedented rate. Rachel Slaybaugh will discuss how many new technologies, including Data Analytics and Machine Learning, can be impactful.MORE about Creating the Future of Nuclear Energy with Rachel Slaybaugh

Film: The Life and Gardens of Beatrix Farrand

Wednesday, November 28 | 6:30-8 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden
This is the first documentary ever produced about the life and gardens of Beatrix Farrand, the most successful female landscape architect in early 20th century America and one of the founders of the American Society of Landscape Architects. Includes a Q&A with the filmmaker, Karyl Evans. MORE about <em>The Life and Gardens of Beatrix Farrand</em>

Conference: Inequality in Life and Death — Policy and Prospect

Thursday, November 29 | 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | Bantao Auditorium Sutardja Dai Hall
Inequality has become a central focus of policy discussions, but inequality has multiple dimensions and many potential policy interventions. This mini-conference will consider inequality from this broad perspective, with presentations by international experts on the Berkeley faculty and a keynote by Peter Orszag, Vice Chairman of Investment Banking and Global Co-Head of Healthcare at Lazard, former director of the Office of Management and Budget under the Obama Administration.MORE about Inequality in Life and Death — Policy and Prospect

Workshop: Botanical Perfume Gift Workshop with Jessica Hannah

Saturday, December 1 | 2-4 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden
Join a two-hour beginner's natural perfume gift workshop. Learn about the history and art of natural perfumes, and create a formula with oils from around the world, including Italian bergamot, Haitian vetiver, Bulgarian rose, and more.MORE about Botanical Perfume Gift Workshop with Jessica Hannah

Music: Shai Wosner, piano

Sunday, December 2 | 3-5 p.m. | Hertz Concert Hall
Born in Israel and educated at Juilliard, pianist Shai Wosner is internationally acclaimed for his insightful interpretations of the music of Schubert. In Wosner's hands, complex works speak with clarity, and here he explores three of the composer's mercurial middle-period sonatas.MORE about Shai Wosner, piano

Shai Wosner

Workshop: Chai and Spice

Sunday, December 2 | 2-4 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden
Come enjoy and learn about the botanical garden’s tropical plant collection that provide the spicy ingredients for chai. Deepa Natarajan will lead you on a journey through spice history and and teach you a couple of recipes for making masala chai. Take home a recipe and spice blend and sip lots of chai along the way.MORE about Chai and Spice

Chai and Spice Workshop

Lecture: Maps of a Rising Water Table — The Hidden Component of Sea Level Rise with Kristina Hill

Tuesday, December 4 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 190 Doe Library
Map-based data viewers have been available for several years that reveal where coastal flooding is likely to occur as oceans warm and ice sheets melt. Recently, geologists have begun to study the influence of sea level rise on groundwater, and have concluded that in some coastal areas, as much or more land could flood as a result of rising groundwater than will flood directly from saltwater. Kristina Hill will present both the new maps of coastal groundwater depth and some strategies for urban adaptation.MORE about Maps of a Rising Water Table — The Hidden Component of Sea Level Rise with Kristina Hill

Lecture: Accidental Orientalists: Modern Italian Travelers in Ottoman Lands, Barbara Spackman

Wednesday, December 5 | 12-1 p.m. | Geballe Room Stephens Hall
Barbara Spackman’s account, which won the 2017 American Association for Italian Studies Best Book Prize, examines narratives by Italians who, through historical accident, found themselves in Ottoman Egypt and Anatolia in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.MORE about <em>Accidental Orientalists: Modern Italian Travelers in Ottoman Lands</em>, Barbara Spackman

Reading: Lunch Poems — Mary Jo Bang

Thursday, December 6 | 12:10-12:50 p.m. | Morrison Library Doe Library
Lunch Poems presents poet Mary Jo Bang, author of eight books of poems — including A Doll For Throwing, Louise in Love, The Last Two Seconds, and Elegy, which received the National Book Critics Circle Award.MORE about Lunch Poems — Mary Jo Bang

Music: Charles Lloyd and The Marvels with Lucinda Williams

Thursday, December 6 | 8-10 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall
In response to the presidential inauguration of 2017, saxophonist and NEA Jazz Master Charles Lloyd and his band The Marvels joined Lucinda Williams to release a rendition of Bob Dylan’s protest song “Masters of War.” The success of that single has led to a new collaboration and Blue Note album, Vanished Gardens, that adds Williams’ distinctive voice to an all-star lineup that includes jazz-Americana heroes Greg Leisz on pedal steel, Reuben Rogers on bass, and Eric Harland on drums.MORE about Charles Lloyd and The Marvels with Lucinda Williams

Dance: Pavel Zustiak and Palissimo Company

Friday, December 7 | 8-10 p.m. | Zellerbach Playhouse
Choreographer Pavel Zustiak and his Palissimo Company ask, “Where do we find beauty today, and does it need our defense?” Zustiak creates an immersive visual experience for Custodians of Beauty, combining movement with imagery, light, and sound in response to a 2009 speech by Pope Benedict XVI, reminding artists of their responsibilities as “custodians of beauty in the world.”MORE about Pavel Zustiak and Palissimo Company

Pavel Zustiak and Palissimo Company

Workshop: Mindful Self-Compassion — Core Skills Training

December 7 – 8, 2018 every day | 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. | Chevron Auditorium International House
This two-day workshop is an introduction to Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC), an empirically-supported training program based on the research of Kristin Neff and the clinical perspective of Chris Germer.MORE about Mindful Self-Compassion — Core Skills Training

Music: UC Berkeley Symphony Orchestra

December 7 – 8, 2018 every day | 8 p.m. | Hertz Concert Hall
Listen to Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring" and Rachmaninoff's "Symphony No. 2" as David Milnes, music director, leads UC Berkeley Symphony Orchestra, the oldest performing arts ensemble in the University of California system.MORE about UC Berkeley Symphony Orchestra

Workshop: Block Printed Wrapping Paper

Sunday, December 9 | 11 a.m.-2 p.m. | Hearst Museum of Anthropology
Join this month's Family Workshop at the Hearst Museum. Make your own wrapping paper for the holidays and learn about the traditional techniques of block printing. This is a drop-in workshop for all ages, included free with museum admission.MORE about Block Printed Wrapping Paper

Block Printed Wrapping Paper

Botanical Holiday Craft Workshop

Sunday, December 9 | 2-4 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden
Come enjoy the holidays at the garden with a fun and festive room filled with botanical craft stations. Create a host of gifts and decorations for yourself and family for the holidays.MORE about

Theater: Big Dance Theater — 17c

Thursday, December 13 | 8-10 p.m. | Zellerbach Playhouse
For more than two decades, the Obie Award-winning Big Dance Theater has been making work that undermines genre boundaries. The company’s latest effort is a portrait of Samuel Pepys, the outlandish 17th-century politician whose obsessive, tell-all diaries are a startling precursor to our own social media culture. Continues through Dec. 16.MORE about Big Dance Theater — <em>17c</em>

Big Dance Theater

Tour: Conifers of the Garden Walking Tour with Chris Carmichael

Tuesday, December 18 | 10-11:30 a.m. | UC Botanical Garden
Join Chris Carmichael, Research Affiliate and former Associate Director of Collections & Horticulture, on a tour of the Botanical Garden's vast collection of conifers.MORE about Conifers of the Garden Walking Tour with Chris Carmichael

Special Event: Winter Solstice Sound Bath

Friday, December 21 | 12-1 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden
With the return of the sun comes a promise from nature of renewal and growth. Attune with the natural slow, calm, inward energy of the Winter Solstice during this unique concert with live meditative sounds of quartz crystal singing bowls and finely tuned gongs within a grove of redwoods.MORE about Winter Solstice Sound Bath

Dance: Hubbard Street Dance Chicago

Friday, January 18 | 8-10 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall
Over its 40-year-history, Hubbard Street Dance Chicago has tackled a thrilling range of repertoire, working with both veteran choreographers and fresh voices reimagining contemporary dance for new generations. For Program A, the company's dancers perform work by Nacho Duato, Crystal Pite, Alejandro Cerrudo and William Forsythe. Program B features the Bay Area premiere of a new collaboration by two choreographers redefining what it means to make dances today: Emma Portner and Lil Buck. Continues through January 20.MORE about Hubbard Street Dance Chicago

Hubbard Street Dance Chicago

David Finckel, cello; Wu Han, piano

Sunday, January 20 | 3-5 p.m. | Hertz Concert Hall
Pianist Wu Han and cellist David Finckel, husband-and-wife duo, co-artistic directors of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and Music@Menlo, visit with a program of three cello sonatas that highlight the mastery of the German Classical and Romantic traditions.MORE about

David Finckel and Wu Han

Music: Kronos Quartet — Fifty for the Future

Friday, January 25 | 8-10 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall
After 45 years spent re-inventing the string quartet, Kronos is committing to the next generation of musical innovators, with Fifty for the Future. The ambitious and much-lauded commissioning initiative returns to Berkeley, where Cal Performances is among the project’s legacy partners, with a program of new works by a diverse international cohort of composers.MORE about Kronos Quartet — Fifty for the Future

Music: Nicola Benedetti, violin; Alexei Grynyuk, piano

Sunday, January 27 | 3-5 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall
Scottish violin star Nicola Benedetti lends her sumptuous, gleaming tone to Bach's glorious Chaconne from Partita No. 2, and is joined by renowned pianist Alexei Grynyuk for richly Romantic sonatas by Prokofiev and Richard Strauss. She also performs the West Coast premiere of a new solo violin work by Wynton Marsalis. MORE about Nicola Benedetti, violin; Alexei Grynyuk, piano

Nicola Benedetti

Lecture: Somini Sengupta | The Sarah Kailath Memorial Lecturer for 2018

Thursday, January 31 | 5-7 p.m. | TBD | Note change in date
Award–winning journalist Somini Sengupta delivers the 7th Annual Sarah Kailath Memorial Lecture on the theme of Women and Leadership.MORE about Somini Sengupta | The Sarah Kailath Memorial Lecturer for 2018

Somini Sengupta

Music: Yefim Bronfman, piano

Friday, February 1 | 8-10 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall
Yefim Bronfman last graced the stages of Cal Performances with a heroic cycle of the complete Prokofiev piano sonatas. Here, he further reveals the emotional breadth of his musical temperament, in works ranging from Schumann's mercurial Humoreske, to Debussy's richly impressionistic Suite bergamasque, and Schubert's late-period gem the Sonata in C minor.MORE about Yefim Bronfman, piano

Yefim Bronfman

Performing Arts: Kodo

Saturday, February 2 | 8-10 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall
Taiko ensemble Kodo returns with Evolution, a retrospective that traces the group’s history with signature works created from the 1970s to the present.MORE about Kodo

Reading: Lunch Poems — Ari Banias

Thursday, February 7 | 12:10-12:50 p.m. | Morrison Library Doe Library
Lunch Poems presents Ari Banias, author of Anybody, which was named a finalist for the Kate Tufts Discovery Award and the PEN Center USA Literary Award. His poems have appeared in various journals and he is the recipient of numerous fellowships.MORE about Lunch Poems — Ari Banias

Reading: Lunch Poems — Tarfia Faizullah

Thursday, March 7 | 12:10-12:50 p.m. | Morrison Library Doe Library
Lunch Poems presents Tarfia Faizullah, author of Registers of Illuminated Villages and Seam. She is the winner of numerous awards and her poems are published widely in periodicals and anthologies.MORE about Lunch Poems — Tarfia Faizullah

Reading: Lunch Poems — Ben Lerner

Thursday, April 4 | 12:10-12:50 p.m. | Morrison Library Doe Library
Lunch Poems presents Ben Lerner, who has received fellowships from the Fulbright, Guggenheim and MacArthur Foundations and is the author of three books of poetry (The Lichtenberg Figures, Angle of Yaw and Mean Free Path), two novels (Leaving the Atocha Station and 10:04) and a work of criticism (The Hatred of Poetry). His most recent books are collaborations: Blossom (with Thomas Demand), The Polish Rider (with Anna Ostoya), and The Snows of Venice (with Alexander Kluge).MORE about Lunch Poems — Ben Lerner

Special Event: Cal Day

Saturday, April 13 | 9 a.m.-4 p.m. | UC Berkeley Campus
UC Berkeley throws open its doors and offers over 300 lectures, tours, performances, demonstrations and discussions. Many events are tailored for kids & families, prospective students, and the just plain curious. Come experience a day in the life of UC Berkeley! All events free, all ages welcome, campuswide.MORE about Cal Day

Reading: Lunch Poems — Student Reading

Thursday, May 2 | 12:10-12:50 p.m. | Morrison Library Doe Library
One of the year’s liveliest events, the student reading includes winners of the following prizes: Academy of American Poets, Cook, Rosenberg, and Yang, as well as students nominated by Berkeley’s creative writing faculty, Lunch Poems volunteers, and representatives from student publications.MORE about Lunch Poems — Student Reading

ONGOING: Exhibits around campus >