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Thursday

Panel discussion: Music and protest
Thursday, October 30 | 12:30-2 p.m. | Banatao Auditorium Sutardja Dai Hall

Mavis StaplesMusic has always played a key role in protest movements. As part of the campus's celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Free Speech Movement, panelists will discuss the historic role of music in social change. Panelists include jazz legend Mavis Staples; UC Berkeley professors of history Mark Peterson and Waldo Martin; the founder of Arhoolie Records, Chris Strachwitz, and PhD candidate and jazz vocalist, Kim Nalley.



Science@Cal: Fact, myth and controversy of GMO foods
Thursday, October 30 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Banatao Auditorium, 310 Sutardja Dai Hall Sutardja Dai Hall

Graphic of food plantsWe care about the food we eat. So, what should we know about GMOs? Join eminent scientists from UC Berkeley to understand the basic scientific principles behind Genetically Modified Organisms and the socioeconomic and environmental implications of their use.



Music: Mavis Staples
Thursday, October 30 | 8 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall

Mavis StaplesGrammy Lifetime Achievement Award-winner Mavis Staples lends her voice to songs introspective and uplifting, from the gospel standards and civil rights anthems she sang for decades, to wide-ranging pop music born from collaborations with artists like The Band and Nick Lowe. Staples will perform selections from her latest recording “One True Vine”. Her appearance is in association with UC Berkeley's On the Same Page program, marking the 50th anniversary of the Free Speech Movement.

 $18 and up
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-9988, or by emailing tickets@calperformances.org.


Film: The Activist
Thursday, October 30 | 7 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from The ActivistScorned during its day, The Activist is re-activated for your renewed perusal. Activist-turned-actor Michael Smith plays a radical opposed to the war in Vietnam in this youth-market entry, shot on the streets of Berkeley. With its street-smart lead and proximity to the antiwar protests it appropriates, The Activist claims an authenticity out of reach to others of its ilk. A member of the Oakland Seven, “Stop the Draft” activists tried for conspiracy in Alameda County, Smith plays a version of himself, a committed Berkeley activist contesting the war in Vietnam. After a demonstration goes bad, he seeks refuge at a friend’s house and there meets Lee, played by real-life girlfriend Leslie Gilbrun. This seat-of-its-pants pic alternates between the budding romance, Lee’s fitful coming to political awareness, and plans to occupy the draft induction center and its resulting skirmish.

 $9.50 General Admission,  $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and retirees; Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Youth (17 & under),  $5.50 BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley students

Theater: Rabbit Hole
October 30 – November 1, 2014 every day | 8 p.m. | Room 7 Zellerbach Hall

This Pulitzer Prize-winning play follows a married couple coping with the death of their four year-old son. As the horrific accident twists their closest relationships and challenges their deepest-held beliefs, the play reveals that their version of reality - their rabbit hole - could belong to anyone.

 $15 General Admission,  $10 students, seniors, UCB faculty & staff

Exhibit: Design Radicals, creativity and protest
October 16 – December 19, 2014 every day | 210 Wurster Hall

The shock waves of Berkeley’s Free Speech Movement of 1964 reverberated within Wurster Hall, transforming the College of Environmental Design into a Laboratory for experiments in countercultural art and politics. Design Radicals surveys student and faculty ventures in the graphic art of anti-war protest, hands-on research into commune building and the creation of ecologically sustainable structures, and efforts to recast architecture, landscape architecture and community planning as participatory enterprises. In telling the story of Wurster Hall’s Design Radicals, the rich holdings of the Environmental Design Archives and the privately held Dox Populi poster collection will provide inspiration for a new generation of design activists. The College of Environmental Design Library will display posters, images, and artifacts of Berkeley’s expanded field of countercultural design practice and pedagogy.



Exhibit: Joseph Holtzman
October 17 – December 21, 2014 every Sunday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday | 11 a.m.-5 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Joseph Holtzman: Mary Todd Lincoln, 1880, 2007; oil on marble; 44 x 35 in.; courtesy of the artist.Joseph Holtzman’s unusual artistic sensibility evolved from his close study of historical painting and his connoisseurship of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century decorative arts. His themes and motifs draw on these diverse sources as well as allude to family and friends, cultural personalities, historical figures, and literary characters. Balancing his wide-ranging references is an intensely sensual connection to paint and surface. Holtzman (b. 1957) is highly attentive to the unique qualities of color and texture that can be expressed through the medium of paint on various grounds. His palette is fantastically rich and varied and he achieves remarkable chromatic and tonal effects by exploiting not only the transparency of the oil medium but also the unusual capacity of marble—his favorite surface—to absorb and reflect light.

 $10 General Admission,  $7 Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Young adults (13-17),  $0 BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley students, faculty, staff, and retirees; Children (12&under)

Exhibit: American Wonder
October 1 – December 21, 2014 every Sunday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday | 11 a.m.-5 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

John Brewster, Jr. (attributed to): Portrait of a Boy in Green, c. 1805–10; oil on canvas; 53 ¾ x 32 ¼ in.; gift of W. B. Carnochan.American Wonder captures our burgeoning nation during a time of enormous change, from the Declaration of Independence in 1776 to the onset of the Civil War in 1861. The exhibition includes approximately fifty portraits, landscapes, commemorative mourning pictures, weather vanes, and decorative sculptures from the BAM/PFA collection. This distinguished collection is one of the finest of American folk art in California.

 $10 General Admission,  $7 Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Young adults (13-17),  $0 BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley students, faculty, staff, and retirees; Children (12&under)

Exhibit: Birds Do It, Bees Do It
September 8, 2014 – February 28, 2015 every day | Bernice Layne Brown Gallery Doe Library

Sex ed imageFrom junior high school hygiene films to websites, public health campaigns, scientific studies, children’s books, bodice-ripper novels and (sometimes) parents, Americans have always found ways to learn about sex. That information has at times been incorrect or incomplete, and has rarely been delivered without a larger political or moral agenda. While attitudes towards sex education swing from the blissfulness of ignorance to the empowerment of liberation, every generation finds new ways to answer the old questions. Our desire to learn about desire has not changed. This exhibition draws from the resources of campus libraries, from our academic programs, and from social services provided for the Berkeley campus community.



Exhibit: California, Captured on Canvas
October 8, 2014 – March 6, 2015 every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | Bancroft Library

This exhibit portrays California both as a vast landscape of mountains, ocean, and forests and as an intimate home for vastly different inhabitants. Scenes of Yosemite and the Gold Rush are displayed, along with more recent work such as colorful paintings by John Sackas of the Golden Gate Produce Market. Also featured are Augustus John’s vibrant portrait of San Francisco’s tennis champion Helen Wills, and an imposing painting by Charles Grant of the Great White Fleet entering the Golden Gate on May 5th 1908. The exhibit conveys the variety of artistic prisms through which the Golden State has been captured on canvas.


today

Film: Eyes Wide Shut
Friday, October 31 | 7:30 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from Eyes Wide ShutKubrick had been mesmerized by Schnitzler’s erotic novella since the late sixties, trying several times to arouse interest in the adaptation. This traumnovelle, literally “dreamstory,” involves a married couple, played by real-life duo Tom Cruise as Dr. Bill Harford and Nicole Kidman as Alice H., who free fall through a psychological landscape of libido and longing. The first steps toward their eventual plunge are delicate and untended as they tease each other with fantastical seductions and saucy dreams, all leading to that accelerating drop into appetite. A truly erotic outing, Eyes Wide Shut is like a caution sign on the road of excess.

 $5.50 BAM/PFA members, UC Berkeley students,  $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and retirees; Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General Admission
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-5249.


Panel discussion: Chile California conference
Friday, October 31 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 105 Boalt Hall, School of Law

Professor Robert Reich and Professor Benavente will discuss the origins and consequences of inequality in the U.S. and Chilean economies with Harley Shaiken, Professor and Chair of Berkeley’s Center for Latin American Studies.



Seminar: How to assemble a bacteria cell
Friday, October 31 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

Graphic of bacteriaIn this discussion, University of Washington professor of bioengineering, Paul Wiggoins, will outline the current understanding of bacterial organization and present new insights based on our recent experiments. Genome-scale analysis reveals complexity in patterning and in the behavior of DNA-binding proteins.



Music: UC Berkeley symphony orchestra, Rachmaninoff and Prokofiev
October 31 – November 1, 2014 every day | 8-10 p.m. | Hertz Concert Hall

UC Berkeley Symphony Orchestra posterDavid Milnes, conducts the UC Berkeley symphony orchestra in a performance of Rachmaninoff’s Symphonic Dances and Prokofiev’s Sinfonia Concertante. Performance will feature Melondy Huang, cello soloist.

 $16 general admission (all seats unreserved),  $12 students (non-UCB), seniors,  $5 UC Berkeley students (student ID required)
Advance tickets from the Zellerbach Hall ticket office or at the door starting one hour before the performance. Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-9988, or by emailing tickets@berkeley.edu.

SaturdayBack to top

Botanical garden: The hungry owl project
Saturday, November 1 | 1-2:30 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden

Barn OwlLearn about owls in the Bay Area and their natural history. Visit with a live ambassador owl and have your questions answered by owl experts.

 $15/$10 members; $5 youth (3-17)
Register online, or by calling 510-643-2755, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu.


Conference: Chile-California conference
Saturday, November 1 | 8 a.m.-6:45 p.m. | 105 Stanley Hall

This annual conference aims to promote the exchange of ideas and create an international collaboration between faculty, students, entrepreneurs, and professionals from Chile and California. This initiative started in 2012 as a collaborative work between Chilean students in UC Davis, Stanford, and UC Berkeley supported by the Chilean General Consulate in San Francisco, Chile Global, and the Chile-California Council. This year’s conference will be focused on the social and economic challenges that Chile and California share. How to innovate and grow while striving for an inclusive and sustainable development that reduces existing levels of inequality? Speakers include Ambassador of Chile Juan Gabriel Valdes, Berkeley economist Emmanuel Saez, and more.

 $22.09
Tickets go on sale October 1. Buy tickets online, or or by emailing contact@cal3.org.


Special event: Lawrence Hall of Science gala
Saturday, November 1 | 6:30-9:30 p.m. | Lawrence Hall of Science

Inspiring Young Minds GalaUnleash your inner child and treat your inquiring mind to an imaginative Gala benefitting the Lawrence Hall of Science. Rubbing elbows with actual scientists, test your ingenuity with hands-on activities to see how small-scale tinkering leads to large-scale innovation. Come celebrate the Hall's continued success in sparking interest in science and supporting lifelong fascinations as you enjoy inventive food, cocktails, and entertainment in a dynamic program. Special guests include 2013 Nobel Laureate Randy W. Schekman and San Francisco Giants announcer Renel Brooks-Moon.

 $250 General Ticket,  $500 Patron Ticket,  $1,000 Sponsor Ticket
Buy tickets online, or by calling Linda Rafferty at 510-664-4921, or by emailing Linda Rafferty at develop@berkeley.edu.

SundayBack to top

Music: Jorge Federico Osorio, piano
Sunday, November 2 | 3 p.m. | Hertz Concert Hall

Jorge Federico OsorioJorge Federico Osorio blends a refined interpretive skill with his sterling technique for Mussorgsky's beloved and opulent suite Pictures at an Exhibition. For Schubert's gripping final piano sonata, Osorio applies a poet's sensibility, revealing new qualities in the familiar work. The performance features works by Bach, Schubert, Tchaikovsky, Albeniz, Castro, & Mussorgsky.

 $32 and up
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-9988, or by emailing tickets@calperformances.org.

MondayBack to top

Panel discussion: Religion and the art of the novel
Monday, November 3 | 6 p.m. | Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

Marilynne Robinson, Robert Hass, Dorothy Hale, Jonathan SheenanMarilynne Robinson is a professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop and author of Gilead, which won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the 2004 National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction. She is also the author of four books of nonfiction, The Death of Adam, Absence of Mind, When I Was a Child I Read Books, and Mother Country. In 2013, Robinson was awarded the National Humanities Medal. In this panel discussion, Marilynne Robinson will be joined by UC Berkeley professors Dorothy Hale (English), Jonathan Sheehan (History), and Robert Hass (English), to discuss religion and the art of the novel.



Lecture: Marilynne Robinson on the question of audience in Shakespeare
Monday, November 3 | 1 p.m. | Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

Marilynne RobinsonMarilynne Robinson is a professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop and author of Gilead, which won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the 2004 National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction. She is also the author of four books of nonfiction, The Death of Adam, Absence of Mind, When I Was a Child I Read Books, and Mother Country. In 2013, Robinson was awarded the National Humanities Medal. Her Avenali lecture will consider the question of audience in the work of Shakespeare and be followed by a response by UC Berkeley professor of English, Jeffrey Knapp.



Panel discussion: Soil health
Monday, November 3 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Morgan Lounge Morgan Hall

Soil with earthwormsSoil health is the basis for the ecosystem services that soils deliver to society, such as plant growth, erosion control, and pollutant mitigation. Its great importance to agriculture has prompted the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) to develop a national Soil health Initiative to meet the challenges of farming in the 21st century. Important questions remain as to how these practices should be implemented and their results assessed. Does managing for soil health differ from the management practices in organic farming? Can soil health be quantified or is it only an intangible, qualitative concept? Our panel, which includes academic, agency, and grower perspectives, will discuss these and other questions that are driving new research and stimulating changes in the way agriculture is done today.



Lecture: Cheryl Haines on creative interventions and social activation
Monday, November 3 | 7:30-9 p.m. | David Brower Center, 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley

@Large Exhibit on AlcatrazCheryl Haines has curated numerous exhibitions for both local and internationally-renowned artists. Haines will share details of the behind-the-scenes process of curating and assembling an exhibition, spotlighting her current work, @Large: Ai Weiwei on Alcatraz, for which Ai Weiwei (艾未未) has created sculpture, sound and mixed-media installations for the infamous former prison. Haines will look at how exhibitions can “intervene” in a space to provoke thought, stimulate the sense, and incite social action.

 Tickets are available online and at the door. Ticketed attendees will be admitted on a first come, first served basis.
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-495-3505, or by emailing info.bcnm@berkeley.edu.

TuesdayBack to top

Social event: Election night watch party
Tuesday, November 4 | 5 p.m. | Location TBD Moses Hall

People holding American flagsJoin fellow political junkies to watch the returns on a big screen. Who will win the close Oakland Mayor's race? Will the Republicans take over the Senate? Can Neal Kasharki overcome his 35+ point deficit to beat Governor Jerry Brown? Come and find out!



Social event: Pet Hugs
Tuesday, November 4 | 12-1 p.m. | Sproul Plaza

Come and get your instant stress relief with adorable dogs from ARF, Tony La Russa's Animal Rescue Foundation. Studies show interaction with companion animals lowers blood pressure, reduces anxiety and otherwise improves one’s physical and mental health.



Author talk: Walter Benjamin: A Critical Life
Tuesday, November 4 | 5-7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

Book jacket for Walter Benjamin: A Critical LifeJoin the authors and editor of Walter Benjamin: A Critical Life (Harvard University Press, 2014) moderated by Martin Jay, UC Berkeley professor of history. Authors Howard Eiland and Michael W. Jennings have been collaborating since the early 1990s on translating and editing the works of Walter Benjamin, including The Arcades Project, Berlin Childhood around 1900, On Hashish, Early Writings 1910-1917, and the four volumes of the Selected Writings. In this discussion they will discuss their work and Benjamin's thought as a lens through which to observe the sweeping socio-political changes around the globe.


WednesdayBack to top

Panel discussion: California water conflicts
Wednesday, November 5 | 7 p.m. | David Brower Center, 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley

Nicasio ReservoirThis panel discussion will focus on past and present water debates in California, which has been called “the most hydrologically altered landmass on the planet.” We will examine California’s water history, exploring the successes and failures of three major water redistribution projects: Mono Lake, San Joaquin River, and the Hetch Hetchy Aqueduct. Special guests will include Mono Lake Committee's Geoff McQuilkin; Natural Resources Defense Council's Monty Schmitt and Friant Water Authority's Steve Ottemoeller in discussion about the San Joaquin River; and Restore Hetch Hetchy's Spreck Rosekrans and the San Francisco Public Utility Commission's Michael Carlin in discussion about Hetch Hetchy Valley.

RSVP online.


Noon concert: Jazz ensemble
Wednesday, November 5 | 12:15-1 p.m. | Hertz Concert Hall

Christopher YoumansThe jazz ensemble featuring Christopher Youmans, vocals, guitar; Kevin Wang, piano; Mark Strother, bass guitar; Adam Wilson, drums, will perform original compositions by Christopher Youmans.



Author talk: Our Word is Our Bond, Marianne Constable
Wednesday, November 5 | 12-1 p.m. | Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall Stephens Hall

Book jacket for Our Word Is Our BondProfessor of rhetoric Marianne Constable specializes in legal rhetoric and philosophy, Anglo-American legal traditions, continental philosophy, and contemporary law and society. Her book, Our Word is Our Bond: How Legal Speech Acts, proposes understanding law as language, rather than as primarily rules, policy, or force. Words can be misspoken, misheard, misunderstood, or misappropriated; they can be inappropriate, inaccurate, dangerous, or wrong. When speech goes wrong, law often steps in as itself a speech act. Constable will speak briefly about her work and then open the floor for discussion.



Lecture: john powell on the path or a fair and inclusive society
Wednesday, November 5 | 7:30 p.m. | St. John's Presbyterian Church, 2727 College Ave., Berkeley

john powellHow can we work together to create political, economic, and social systems that support individuals in becoming compassionate, competent, and responsible members of the wider community? While justice and fairness are needed to support effective participation, how do we ensure that those who are excluded whether it be by race, class, gender, disability, sexual orientation, or the like belong and are included in the circle of human concern? john powell, UC Berkeley professor at the Haas Institute for a fair and inclusive society, will discuss these and other questions.

 $12 Advance Purchase,  $15 Purchase at the Door
ThursdayBack to top

Film: A Time to Live and a Time to Die
Thursday, November 6 | 7 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from A Time to Live and a Time to DieIn this eloquently simple autobiographical film set and filmed in the village of Hou's youth, little Ah-ha's family has moved from Kwangtun Province in China to try on life in Taiwan. It is 1947. Clearly, they will never go back, at least, not in body, and not as a family. But for the boy and his siblings this is the only world, anyway, and Hou's camera patiently allows it to unfold in selected small, often humorous, sometimes mundane manifestations, knowing but not caring that a revolution is just a shot away.

 $5.50 BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley students,  $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and retirees; Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General Admission
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-5249.


Lunch poems: Robin Robertson
Thursday, November 6 | 12:10-12:50 p.m. | Morrison Library Doe Library

Robin RobertsonRobin Robertson is from the Northeast coast of Scotland. He has published five collections of poetry—most recently Hill of Doors—and received a number of accolades, including the Petrarch Prize, the E.M. Forster Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Cholmondeley Award, and all three Forward Prizes. He has also edited a collection of essays, Mortification: Writers’ Stories of Their Public Shame; translated two plays of Euripides, Medea and the Bacchae; and, in 2006, published The Deleted World, a selection of free-English versions of poems by Nobel laureate Tomas Tranströmer. His selected poems, Sailing the Forest, will publish in Fall 2014.



Lecture: Ukraine after the Rada elections
Thursday, November 6 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

Edward WalkerUC Berkeley professor of political science, Edward Walker, will discuss his experience in Ukraine during the recent Rada elections that took place on October 26, 2014. Professor Walker will discuss the current situations and what may lie ahead.



Panel discussion: Human rights in world literature
Thursday, November 6 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

Elizabeth AnkerOver the past fifty years, debates about human rights have assumed an increasingly prominent place in postcolonial literature and theory. Writers from Salman Rushdie to Nawal El Saadawi have used the novel to explore both the possibilities and challenges of enacting and protecting human rights, particularly in the Global South. In this roundtable discussion, Cornell University professor and author Elizabeth Anker will discuss her book, Fictions of Dignity and fictions of human dignity and bodily integrity. Anker will discuss Fictions of Dignity in conversation with UC Berkeley faculty members.


FridayBack to top

Music: Dalalæða, cellos and electronics
Friday, November 7 | 7:30 p.m. | Gallery B Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Iceland landscapeExplore the intersection of sound, space, and painting with three new electro-acoustic compositions commissioned by artist John Zurier to accompany his new exhibition of paintings and watercolors inspired by Iceland. Icelandic composers Úlfur Hansson and Georg Hilmarsson and Bay Area based composer Amadeus Regucera wrote the works for members of the all-cello ensemble Celli@Berkeley.

 Free! BAM/PFA members and UC Berkeley students, faculty, and staff.,  $7 General Admission
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-0808.


Seminar: Self-compassion and the cultivation of happiness
Friday, November 7 | 9 a.m.-4 p.m. | Chevron Auditorium International House

Kristin NeffA large and growing body of research suggests that self-compassion reduces anxiety, makes us more resilient in the face of challenges, and improves overall our mental health. Drawing on a decade of her trailblazing research, Dr. Kristin Neff will provide simple tools for giving ourselves the support we need whenever we suffer, fail, or feel inadequate. She will provide an introductory overview of self-compassion, weaving together lecture, scientific research, video presentations, small group exercises, and discussion.

 $149 Standard Registration (CEUs),  $129 Student/Intern Registration (No CEUs)
Registration opens September 18. Register by November 7 online.


Theater: Six Characters in Search of an Author
November 7 – 8, 2014 every day | 8 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall

Theatre De La VilleThéâtre de la Ville returns with their trademark innovative artistry, balancing a fierce creative spirit with reverence for the classics. The troupe's acclaimed production of Pirandello's absurdist psychological drama bursts out of the academic canon. Performed in French with English surtitles, the play finds a group of actors confronted onstage by six characters trapped in literary limbo, searching for an author to finish the story they have been written into.

 $30 and up
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-9988, or by emailing tickets@calperformances.org.


Exhibit: Siméon-Denis Poisson, mathematics in the service of science
November 7 – December 17, 2014 every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | Mathematics Statistics Library (100 Evans) Evans Hall

Mathematician PoissonSiméon-Denis Poisson (1781-1840) was a French mathematician who made important contributions to many areas including celestial mechanics, integration, probability theory, and mathematical physics. This exhibition includes original copies and facsimiles of some of Poisson's works as well as books and articles that illustrate Poisson’s scientific influence, the judgments contemporaries made concerning his role in science, and some of the domains of mathematics and physics where his work has been further developed, making his name familiar to all researchers.


SaturdayBack to top

Film: Buba
Saturday, November 8 | 6 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from BubaLong suppressed and nearly written out of film history, Buba is an exceptional documentary filmed in the remote mountainous region of Racha in northern Georgia. An artistic collaboration between Georgia’s first female director, Noutsa Gogoberidze, and the noted avant-garde painter David Kakabadze, this is a work of exhilarating cinematic splendor—with luminous cinematography and dynamic montage—that was originally intended as propaganda.

 $5.50 BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley students,  $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and retirees; Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General Admission
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-5249.


Special event: Berkeley project day
Saturday, November 8 | 8 a.m.-4 p.m. | Location to be announced after registration (meet at Sproul Plaza)

The Berkeley Project aims to permanently change the relationship between the students and residents of Berkeley through hands-on community service. Every fall semester we hold our annual Berkeley Project Day event, where we send over 2,000 volunteers to work on various service projects throughout Berkeley and Oakland. Breakfast, lunch, and T-shirts will be provided. Register now here.



Botanical garden: Animals of the garden
Saturday, November 8 | 10-11:30 a.m. | UC Botanical Garden

GoldfinchCome join this special journey to discover the many wonderful creatures living in UC Berkeley’s botanical garden. On our animal hunt, we will learn about newts, birds, butterflies, frogs, lizards, foxes, snakes and more! Hone your skills of observation and learn how plants and animals live together. Program includes a light breakfast and a copy of the “Illustrated Guide to the Common Animals of the East Bay Hills” (one per family).

 $15/$12 members
To register, click the following "online" link:. Register online, or by calling 510-643-2755.


Music: Indonesian music and ance
Saturday, November 8 | 7:30 p.m. | Hertz Concert Hall

Indonesian DanceEnjoy traditional Javanese music and Gambyong Dance, featuring the Javanese Gamelan Ensemble directed by Midiyanto and Lestari Indonesia under the direction of Ninik Lunde.

 $16 general admission (all seats unreserved),  $12 students (non-UCB), seniors,  $5 UC Berkeley students (student ID required)
Advance tickets from the Zellerbach Hall ticket office or at the door starting one hour before the performance. Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-9988, or by emailing tickets@berkeley.edu.

SundayBack to top

Music: Czech Philharmonic Orchestra and Prague Philharmonic Choir
Sunday, November 9 | 3 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall

Czech Philharmonic orchestra and choirRecently reunited with beloved conductor Jiøí Belohlávek, the Czech Philharmonic has long had a special connection to Dvoøák, who conducted its debut performance in 1896 at the Rudolfinum in Prague. "In works by Dvoøák... unbounded lyricism and Czech melancholy emerged with the authenticity that only this orchestra can bring, and they delivered with discipline" (The Guardian, UK). Dvoøák's beautiful, tender choral work is a rare liturgical setting of mourning and healing.

 $36 and up
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-9988, or by emailing tickets@calperformances.org.


Film: Daughter of the Nile
Sunday, November 9 | 6 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from Daughter of the NileA young woman and her brother float along the periphery of the Taipei underworld in Hou Hsiao-hsien’s intriguing blend of gangster tale and mood-drenched introspective drama. Looking down on Taipei’s neon lights from her rural subdivision, the pretty Sao-Yang (pop star Yang Lin) spends her days caring for her little sister and grandfather, and heads into the city at night to gather with her club-owning brother and his cream-jacketed, shoulder-padded friends for drinks, dinners, and random flirtations. A gang war may be brewing; sudden shootouts and stylish karaoke nightclub sessions are interspersed with homework, crap jobs at Kentucky Fried Chicken, and listening to grandpa drone on about his lottery chances.

 $5.50 BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley students,  $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and retirees; Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General Admission
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-5249.


Film: Our Courtyard
Sunday, November 9 | 4 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from Our CourtyardThe picaresque village comedy is updated for Georgia’s postwar urban realities in Rezo Chkheidze’s lyrical tale of life, love, and the pursuit of individual happiness and the collective good inside a chaotic Tbilisi courtyard. “Before we show you our yard, we’d like to show you our ancient but eternally young Tbilisi,” our narrator proudly chirps as the camera pans over the city’s attractive skyline, before swooping into the good-natured chaos of one neighborhood apartment block. Students, scientists, factory workers, and idle gossips call out from the balconies of its courtyard, led by our hero Dato, a strapping student and factory worker with an eye for the lovely Tsitsino.

 $5.50 BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley students,  $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and retirees; Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General Admission
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-5249.


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