Critic’s choice

It’s all happening at Berkeley

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. Photos by Andrew Eccles
Critic’s choice
Fri. 4/20 – 4/22
Saturday 4/21

Music: Ritual Noise - LEXAGON, Titania Kumeh, Earthbound

Saturday, February 24 | 7 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Programmed by Chika Okoye and David Brazil, the three-part performance event of sound and ritual LEXAGON brings an Afrofuturist sonic mirage, weaving together loops of soulful vocals, clarinet, and theremin. Titania Kumeh’s performances are meditations on her family, ancestry, and experiences as a first-generation, Liberian-Bahamian American. Kumeh has performed with the Brontez Purnell Dance Company and in numerous other productions.MORE about Ritual Noise - LEXAGON, Titania Kumeh, Earthbound

Workshop: Natural Perfume Workshop, Jessica Hannah

Saturday, February 24 | 2-4 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden
Join a two-hour beginners' natural perfume workshop. Learn about the history and art of natural perfumes. Create a formula with oils from around the world, including Italian bergamot, Haitian vetiver, Bulgarian rose, and more.MORE about Natural Perfume Workshop, Jessica Hannah

Berkeley Dance Project 2018

February 22 – 24, 2018 every day | 8-10 p.m. | Zellerbach Playhouse
Berkeley Dance Project 2018 features new choreography by Katie Faulkner and James Graham, as well as several TDPS students. James Graham’s collaborative piece explores gender identity, self-understanding, and how we present ourselves in the world, while Katie Faulkner’s multimedia dance work builds imaginative connections between stories of metamorphosis, surreality, and the supernatural. Read the story on the News Center.MORE about

Workshop: The Science of Mindfulness and Self-Compassion

February 23 – 24, 2018 every day | Chevron Auditorium International House
Since the publication of Kristin Neff's groundbreaking book, Self-Compassion, there has been a surge of interest in the science and practice of self-compassion, particularly in clinical settings. But what is self-compassion, how does it relate to the practice of mindfulness, and how can it benefit yourself and your clients, patients, colleagues and loved ones? Self-compassion is made up of three elements: mindfulness, common humanity, and self-kindness. Better understand the relationship among these elements at this two-day immersive workshop with Kristin Neff and Shauna Shapiro, internationally recognized experts on self-compassion and mindfulness.MORE about The Science of Mindfulness and Self-Compassion

Lecture: What happened before the big bang and other big questions about the universe, Michael S. Turner

Monday, February 26 | 5:30-6:30 p.m. | Chevron Auditorium International House
Big ideas like the deep connections between quarks and the cosmos and powerful instruments like the Hubble Space Telescope and Large Hadron Collider have advanced our understanding of the universe. This lecture will describe what we know, what we are trying to figure out and the excitement of the adventure.MORE about What happened before the big bang and other big questions about the universe, Michael S. Turner

Conference: Race and Inequality in America - The Kerner Commission at 50

Tuesday, February 27 | 4 p.m. | Pauley Ballroom Pauley Ballroom, UC Berkeley, 2475 Bancroft Way, Berkeley
The "Race & Inequality in America: The Kerner Commission at 50" conference aims to serve as a landmark, comprehensive investigation of race in American society. The conference will be held February 27-March 1, 2018 at UC Berkeley. Numerous speakers are scheduled to appear. See the website for full information.MORE about Race and Inequality in America - The Kerner Commission at 50

Seminar: Design Field Notes, Paula Te

Tuesday, February 27 | 4-5 p.m. | 220 Jacobs Hall
Paula Te thinks and makes with her hands at Dynamicland, a non-profit research lab and community space. She's there to create a platform for learning that values the whole human body. Moreover, she is driven to make technology accessible in the widest possible sense—across cultures, abilities, and socio-economic statuses. Her research on tangible interfaces for digital fabrication has been featured at SIGCHI IDC and Prix Ars Electronica. MORE about Design Field Notes, Paula Te

Lecture: Townsend Center Berkeley Book Chat - Mark Danner with Joyce Carol Oates

Wednesday, February 28 | 12-1 p.m. | Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Stephens Hall
George W. Bush's War on Terror has led to seventeen years of armed conflict, making it the longest war in U.S. history. Professor Mark Danner examines this state of perpetual struggle and its widespread acceptance in the name of American security. After an introduction by Joyce Carol Oates, Danner will speak briefly about his work and then open the floor for discussion.MORE about Townsend Center Berkeley Book Chat - Mark Danner with Joyce Carol Oates

Lecture: Opening UC History and Success to the World, Jud King

Wednesday, February 28 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Morrison Library Doe Library
150 years following its founding in 1868, the University of California is regarded by many as the most successful and highly-respected public research university in the world. In his new book, Judson King, former Berkeley and University of California provost and former CSHE director, explores the most important factors for this academic success, and what makes UC tick. King is joined by Chancellor Carol T. Christ and University Librarian Jeff Mackie-Mason. RSVP required.MORE about Opening UC History and Success to the World, Jud King

Music: Noon Concert - Spring Choral Collage

Wednesday, February 28 | 12 p.m. | Hertz Concert Hall
Chamber Chorus director Magen Solomon and University Chorus director Nikolas Nackley present music from the last 600 years.MORE about Noon Concert - Spring Choral Collage

Lecture: ARCH Lecture, Daniel M. Abramson

Wednesday, February 28 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall
Professor and author Daniel M. Abramson discusses why the idea of architectural obsolescence was invented in early-twentieth-century America and how it has influenced design and urbanism up to the present age of sustainability.MORE about ARCH Lecture, Daniel M. Abramson

Lecture: The Software Arts, Warren Sacks

Thursday, March 1 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 470 Stephens Hall
Media theorist, software designer, and artist Warren Sacks argues computing grew out of the arts. This argument will be a provocation for some, especially for those who see a bright line dividing the “two cultures” of the arts and the sciences. For others, the argument will not seem provocative at all.MORE about The Software Arts, Warren Sacks

Lecture: The Science of Cannabis - Cannabis as Medicine

Thursday, March 1 | 6-7:30 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden
What are the potential therapeutic benefits of Cannabis to ameliorate physical and psychological illnesses? Because of the constraints on conducting medical research on Cannabis and related products, much available information is empirical and has not been subjected to the rigors of the scientific method. What are the outstanding questions, and how might they be most usefully addressed through research and clinical practice? MORE about The Science of Cannabis - Cannabis as Medicine

Lecture: Pioneering Tech Journalist and Author Kara Swisher

Thursday, March 1 | 6:15-7:45 p.m. | Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center
Listen to Kara Swisher, executive editor of Recode, host of the Recode Decode podcast and co-executive producer of Code Conference. Swisher began covering the digital economy for The Wall Street Journal's San Francisco bureau in 1997. Swisher is author of two books, aol.com: How Steve Case Beat Bill Gates, Nailed the Netheads and Made Millions in the War for the Web and There Must Be a Pony in Here Somewhere: The AOL Time Warner Debacle and the Quest for a Digital Future.MORE about Pioneering Tech Journalist and Author Kara Swisher

Colloquium: California Through Native Eyes - Reclaiming History

Thursday, March 1 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 220 Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union
Traditionally, scholars have treated oral traditions as quaint myths. This presentation argues that California Indian oral traditions present an Indigenous version of California’s history and engaged in the political events of the Great Depression. California Indians used their oral traditions to challenge pre-existing narratives of California’s past, to claim land and place in the 1930s and provide California Indians with a path to follow in the future.MORE about California Through Native Eyes - Reclaiming History

Reading: Lunch Poems - Rosa Alcala

Thursday, March 1 | 12:10-12:50 p.m. | Morrison Library Doe Library
Born and raised in Paterson, NJ, Rosa Alcalá is the author of three books of poetry, most recently MyOTHER TONGUE. Her poetry also appears in a number of anthologies, including Stephen Burt’s The Poem is You: 60 Contemporary American Poems and How to Read Them. The recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Translation Fellowship, her translations are featured in the forthcoming Cecilia Vicuña: New & Selected Poems.MORE about Lunch Poems - Rosa Alcala

Theater: Oh My Sweet Land - A Play and Conversation on the Syrian Conflict

Thursday, March 1 | 7-9 p.m. | Anthony Hall
Join the Center for Middle Eastern Studies and Golden Thread Productions for a performance of the play Oh My Sweet Land, followed by food sharing and community conversation. RSVP required.MORE about <em>Oh My Sweet Land</em> - A Play and Conversation on the Syrian Conflict

Lecture: Jacobs Design Conversations, Allison Arieff

Friday, March 2 | 12-1 p.m. | 310 Jacobs Hall
Allison Arieff, editorial director of SPUR and contributing opinion writer for the New York Times, will speak on “Solving All the Wrong Problems” as part of the Jacobs Design Conversations series.MORE about Jacobs Design Conversations, Allison Arieff

Conference: The Global Women in Data Science Conference

Monday, March 5 | 9 a.m.-6 p.m. | South Hall
The Global Women in Data Science (WiDS) Conference is an annual one-day technical conference based at Stanford, which brings together data scientists and professionals in adjacent fields from around the globe to discuss the latest research and applications of data science. WiDS Berkeley is a regional event that features live-streamed keynotes and technical talks from the WiDS conference. All genders are invited to participate. MORE about The Global Women in Data Science Conference

Music: Kaleidoscope of Song - Classical, Jazz and Musical Theater

Tuesday, March 6 | 4-6 p.m. | Stebbins Lounge Women's Faculty Club
Candace Johnson with pianist Ben Flint performs a variety of songs from a wide range of traditions - classical, jazz and musical theater.MORE about Kaleidoscope of Song - Classical, Jazz and Musical Theater

Special event: Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon - Art + Feminism

Tuesday, March 6 | 12-5 p.m. | 405 Moffitt Undergraduate Library
Wikimedia’s gender trouble is well-documented. To help change that, bring a laptop, power cord and ideas for entries that need updating or creation. Drop in for tutorials for the beginner Wikipedian, reference materials, and refreshments. The editing-averse can stop by to show support. People of all gender identities and expressions are invited to participate.MORE about Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon - Art + Feminism

Lecture: Joseph Slusky - Steel Dreams

Tuesday, March 6 | 7-8:30 p.m. | 210 - Environmental Design Library Atrium Wurster Hall
Joseph Slusky, artist, sculptor and faculty member in the College of Environmental Design for over 30 years, will discuss his sculpture and two-dimensional work spanning a period of over 50 years. Five of his sculptures are on permanent display in the Environmental Design Library.MORE about Joseph Slusky - Steel Dreams

Lecture: ARCH Lecture - Johnston Marklee

Wednesday, March 7 | 7:30-9 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall
Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee, founding partners of an award-winning architecture firm and Artistic Directors for the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial, will talk about their work. Co-sponsored by AIA East Bay.MORE about ARCH Lecture - Johnston Marklee

Music: Noon Concert - Wind Ensemble

Wednesday, March 7 | 12 p.m. | Hertz Concert Hall
Listen to Berkeley's Wind Ensemble directed by Robert Calonico performing Bernstein's "Overture to Candide," Holst's "First Suite in Eb Major," Lauridsen's "O Magnum Mysterium" arranged by Reynolds and Ives' variations on “America.”MORE about Noon Concert - Wind Ensemble

Lecture: Chester W. Nimitz Memorial Lecture - Storm Clouds Over the Western Pacific - Challenges to American Strategy in East Asia

Wednesday, March 7 | 7-9 p.m. | Chevron Auditorium International House
NROTC UC Berkeley presents Admiral Dennis C. Blair at the annual Nimitz Lecture Series. Blair, former U.S. Director of National Intelligence, currently serves as a director and advisor to National Bureau of Asian Research (NBR), Sasakawa Peace Foundation, the Commission on the Theft of American Intellectual Property, the Energy Security Leadership Council of Securing America’s Future Energy, and Freedom House.MORE about Chester W. Nimitz Memorial Lecture - Storm Clouds Over the Western Pacific - Challenges to American Strategy in East Asia

Opening Reception: Face to Face - Looking at Objects That Look at You

Wednesday, March 7 | 5-7 p.m. | Hearst Museum of Anthropology
Celebrate the Phoebe Hearst Museum's new spring exhibit, "Face to Face: Looking at Objects That Look at You." Opening to the public on March 10, this timely exhibit invites visitors to examine how and why faces are depicted in global crafting traditions. Co-curated by Hearst staff and 14 UC Berkeley undergraduate students.MORE about Face to Face - Looking at Objects That Look at You

Film: Cine Latino - I Dream in Another Language

Wednesday, March 7 | 7-9 p.m. | 105 North Gate Hall
A young linguist travels to the jungle of Mexico to research and save a mysterious indigenous language. As he discovers, it's a language at the point of disappearing since the last two speakers had a fight fifty years ago and refuse to speak a word with each other.MORE about Cine Latino - <em>I Dream in Another Language</em>

Lecture: A Little Book on Form - An Exploration into the Formal Imagination of Poetry, Townsend Center Berkeley Book Chat, Robert Hass

Wednesday, March 7 | 12-1 p.m. | Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Stephens Hall
Robert Hass, professor of English and former U.S. poet laureate, reveals the role of instinct and imagination within poetic form. In A Little Book on Form, Hass goes beyond approaching form as merely a set of traditional rules that precede composition.MORE about A Little Book on Form - An Exploration into the Formal Imagination of Poetry, Townsend Center Berkeley Book Chat, Robert Hass

Lecture: Seeing the FSA - Photogrammar Remixes the Documentary Photography of the Great Depression

Thursday, March 8 | 4:30-5:30 p.m. | Banatao Auditorium Sutardja Dai Hall
The Photogrammar Project is a web-based platform for organizing, searching and visualizing the 170,000 photographs from 1935 to 1945 created by the United States Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI). Its development, supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Council of Learned Societies, is a vivid example of contemporary image-based Digital Humanities.MORE about Seeing the FSA - Photogrammar Remixes the Documentary Photography of the Great Depression

Lecture: Covering Trump’s Presidency - Uncharted Waters

Wednesday, March 14 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center
Top DC reporters talk about covering Trump's presidency. Panel includes Carl Hulse, Chief Washington Correspondent of The New York Times and managing editor of First Draft; Paul Kane, columnist on Congress and its interactions with the Trump administration for the Washington Post; Maureen Orth, award-winning journalist, Special Correspondent for Vanity Fair and author; Jake Sherman, senior writer for POLITICO and co-author of POLITICO’s Playbook. RSVP required.MORE about Covering Trump’s Presidency - Uncharted Waters

Lecture: ARCH Lecture, Peggy Deamer

Wednesday, March 14 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall
Yale University architecture professor, editor and author Peggy Deamer will discuss the positive implications of understanding the nature of architectural work as work. In order to be empowered as a designer, employee, and firm owner, it is important socially, economically, and personally to understand the nature of that work. Her current research explores the relationship between subjectivity, design and labor in the current economy.MORE about ARCH Lecture, Peggy Deamer

Music: Noon Concert - Chamber Music

Wednesday, March 14 | 12 p.m. | Hertz Concert Hall
UC Berkeley music students perform chamber music works by Gioachino Rossini and Bedřich Smetana.MORE about Noon Concert - Chamber Music

Theater: All in the Timing - Short Comedies by David Ives

March 15 – 17, 2018 every day | 8-9:15 p.m. | Durham Studio Theater (Dwinelle Hall)
Enjoy an evening of four one-act comedies drawn from the collection of award-winning playwright David Ives, and directed, designed and performed by TDPS students. The four pieces take on the absurdity of being alive and the possibilities of human connection.MORE about All in the Timing - Short Comedies by David Ives

Conference: Sunflowers and Umbrellas - Social Movements, Expressive Practices, and Political Culture in Taiwan and Hong Kong

Friday, March 16 | 9 a.m.-7:45 p.m. | 180 Doe Library
Two-day symposium (with film screening of Yellowing) focuses on two student-led protest movements in 2014 in in Taiwan and Hong Kong, nicknamed “Sunflowers and Umbrellas" respectively. The symposium will attempt to bring new angles to the comparison between Taiwan and Hong Kong, considering both events in a broader historical perspective, which may include student movements in Berkeley and France in 1968 or the 1989 Tiananmen democracy movement.MORE about Sunflowers and Umbrellas - Social Movements, Expressive Practices, and Political Culture in Taiwan and Hong Kong

Panel Discussion: A Conversation with Marion Nestle and Alice Waters

Monday, March 19 | 5-7 p.m. | Goldman Theater David Brower Center, 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley
Join a wide-ranging conversation with renowned local restaurateur and activist Alice Waters and influential alumna and author Marion Nestle, who will talk about the current state of our food system and why they think the food movement is a beacon of light at the intersection of agriculture, food, nutrition, and public health. This talk is part of the 75th Anniversary UC Berkeley School of Public Health Dean’s Speaker Series.MORE about A Conversation with Marion Nestle and Alice Waters

Special Event: Spring Equinox Sound Bath

Tuesday, March 20 | 12-1 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden
Celebrate the first day of spring with this special outdoor concert of quartz crystal singing bowls and finely tuned gongs within a grove of redwoods.MORE about Spring Equinox Sound Bath

Reading: Lunch Poems - Matthew Zapruder

Thursday, April 5 | 12:10-12:50 p.m. | Morrison Library Doe Library
Listen to the poetry of Matthew Zapruder, author of Sun Bear and Why Poetry, a book of prose about poetry. An associate professor in the MFA program at Saint Mary’s College, he is also editor at large at Wave Books, and was editor of the Poetry Column for the New York Times Magazine from 2016-17.MORE about Lunch Poems - Matthew Zapruder

Lecture: Souls in Other Selves, and the Immortality of the Body, Marilyn Strathern

Tuesday, April 17 | 4:10 p.m. | Toll Room Alumni House
Marilyn Strathern, former professor of social anthropology, University of Cambridge, takes participants to a place and time where all beings (including food plants) have souls and where the bodily basis of life is immortalized through cloning, commenting on the way present-day anthropology brings fresh illumination to what we thought we knew.MORE about Souls in Other Selves, and the Immortality of the Body, Marilyn Strathern

Theater: The Dream of Kitamura

April 20 – 22, 2018 every day | 8-10 p.m. | Zellerbach Playhouse
When Lord Rosanjin dreams the demon Kitamura is coming to kill him, his horror is so profound that he hires two bodyguards to defend him against his own hallucinations. But are they who they appear? Written and directed by Philip Kan Gotanda.MORE about <em>The Dream of Kitamura</em>

Special Event: Cal Day

Saturday, April 21 | 9 a.m.-4 p.m. | UC Berkeley Campus
UC Berkeley throws open its doors and offers over 300 lectures, tours, performances, demonstrations and discussions. Many events are tailored for kids & families, prospective students, and the just plain curious. Come experience a day in the life of UC Berkeley - and celebrate our 150th anniversary!MORE about Cal Day

Botanical garden: Spring plant sale

Sunday, April 29 | 10 a.m.-3 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden
Come to the annual Spring Plant Sale and select from a wide variety of plants, featuring drought-tolerant plants.MORE about Spring plant sale

Reading: Lunch Poems - Student Reading

Thursday, May 3 | 12:10-12:50 p.m. | Morrison Library Doe Library
One of the year’s liveliest events, the student reading includes winners of the following prizes: Academy of American Poets, Cook, Rosenberg, and Yang, as well as students nominated by Berkeley’s creative writing faculty, Lunch Poems volunteers, and representatives from student publications.MORE about Lunch Poems - Student Reading

ONGOING: Exhibits around campus >