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Film: The Throwaways
Thursday, January 29 | 6 p.m. | Home Room International House

Promotional image for The ThrowawaysHomeless filmmaker, activist and co-director Ira McKinley, using his unique perspective, exposes how the current economic crisis is having a devastating effect on those who are in greatest need. This documentary challenges viewers to confront the daily struggles and hopes of those living on the fringes of a society that has rejected and forgotten them.


Register online.


Reading: Chana Bloch
Thursday, January 29 | 5-7 p.m. | Morrison Room Doe Library

Chana BlochChana Bloch, award-winning poet, translator, scholar and teacher, will read from her new book. She is the author of five books of poems, six books of translation from Hebrew poetry, ancient and contemporary, and a critical study of George Herbert. Bloch is Professor Emerita of English Literature and Creative Writing at Mills College, where she taught for many years and directed the Creative Writing Program.



Presentation: The forces re-shaping market research and applied social sciences
Thursday, January 29 | 4-6 p.m. | 8th Floor Barrows Hall

Scott McDonaldScott McDonald, adjunct professor of marketing at Columbia Business School former senior VP of research for Conde Nast, will discuss the the increasing availability of “digital footprints” and computational power to analyze them. This data is transforming the practice of market research. Firms are shifting from asking their customers direct questions to analyzing behavioral data that is collected passively. This transformation has profound implications for the kinds of skills required to conduct market research, for how research is organized, and for the shape of future jobs in these fields.



Film: Meerkats in 3D
September 20, 2014 – February 6, 2015 every day | 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. | Lawrence Hall of Science

MeerkatsFilmed over the course of a year, Meerkats 3D follows an extraordinary—not to mention adorable—family that stands just 12 inches tall. Discover how these tiny but strong creatures survive in the harsh desert, led by the family’s tenacious matriarch, Klinky. Together, this family of 20 will battle a rival gang to protect their territory, their pups, and their very lives. The Lawrence Hall of Science's National Geographic 3D Theater plays Meerkats 3D daily.



Exhibit: 2015 first year MFA
January 28 – February 13, 2015 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday | 12-5 p.m. | Worth Ryder Art Gallery (116) Kroeber Hall

Composite image of artists' worksThe Worth Ryder Art Gallery is excited to present “6”, an exhibition of works by our six first-year graduate students. The MFA program encourages experimentation with new methods, media, and modes of artmaking, and the artists have each built on their existing practices to create an exciting new body of work while immersing themselves in contemporary theory, seeking out new interdisciplinary influences, and responding to intense critical feedback by peers and mentors. The result is an exhibition that is fresh, vital, and immediate.



Exhibit: Following in Bartrams' Footsteps
December 15, 2014 – February 15, 2015 every day with exceptions | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden

Bartram botanical paintingThis major art exhibition includes forty-four original artworks based on the native plant discoveries made by John and William Bartram in their renowned and influential travels throughout the eastern wilderness between the 1730s and 1790s. The UC Botanical Garden will be the only West Coast showing of the exhibition.



Botanical garden: Plants illustrated exhibition
January 7 – February 15, 2015 every day with exceptions | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden

Ferns in the gardenView the 6th annual Plants Illustrated exhibition of botanical art featuring work by the Northern California Society of Botanical Artists. This year the pieces will represent plants in the Garden's collection. Free with garden Admission.



Exhibit: California, Captured on Canvas
October 8, 2014 – March 6, 2015 every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | Bancroft Library

This exhibit portrays California both as a vast landscape of mountains, ocean, and forests and as an intimate home for vastly different inhabitants. Scenes of Yosemite and the Gold Rush are displayed, along with more recent work such as colorful paintings by John Sackas of the Golden Gate Produce Market. Also featured are Augustus John’s vibrant portrait of San Francisco’s tennis champion Helen Wills, and an imposing painting by Charles Grant of the Great White Fleet entering the Golden Gate on May 5th 1908. The exhibit conveys the variety of artistic prisms through which the Golden State has been captured on canvas.



Exhibit: The Secret Language of Flowers
January 27 – June 26, 2015 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. | Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

Botanical drawingIn 1984, The Magnes acquired a portfolio of botanical drawings by Shmuel (Samuel) Lerner, a Ukraine-born amateur artist from California. While Lerner’s biography and many details surrounding this work remain obscure, today his drawings open for us a unique window into the landscape, the history and the languages of Israel in the period immediately following the establishment of the State. The exhibition features a selection of 26 botanical drawings from 1949, complete with the author's annotations about plants, places, and language.


FridayBack to top

Film: Something Necessary
Friday, January 30 | 7 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from Something NecessaryJudy Kibinge's moving, beautifully filmed narrative is set in the period subsequent to the civil unrest that erupted in Kenya after the disputed 2007 elections and left over a thousand dead and hundreds of thousands displaced. A woman awakes in a hospital and learns that her husband has died in the riots, her young son is in a coma, and their farm has been destroyed. As she attempts to rebuild her life, her path crosses with that of a young man who participated in the violence. The film was released just prior to the 2013 elections, and according to the director this "meant we were confronting audiences with memories that many would rather forget."

 $5.50 BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley students,  $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and retirees; Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General Admission
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-5249.


Colloqium: The China Model, civil society under authoritarianism
Friday, January 30 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

Book jacket for Civil Society under AuthoritarianismJessica Teets, professor of political science at Middlebury College, will discuss her book and the increasing civil society activity in China despite the authoritarian government’s fears of civil society serving as a Trojan horse of democracy. The author argues that two decades of direct experience with these organizations has taught local officials that civil society also offers many benefits, such as delivering social services and improving governance, and has resulted in the construction of a consultative authoritarianism model attempting to balance the benefits and dangers of civil society.



Special event:Conversation and performance with Myra Melford
Friday, January 30 | 6-9 p.m. | Home of Harry Bernstein and Caren Meghreblian

Myra MelfordJoin a lively evening of food, cocktails, and a special piano performance and salon conversation with UC Berkeley faculty member, composer, and Guggenheim Fellow, Myra Melford. Start the evening with a signature cocktail prepared by Shanna Farrell, head researcher for “West Coast Cocktails: An Oral History” project at UC Berkeley’s Regional Oral History Office, before Melford performs music from her recent solo recording: Life Carries Me This Way, work inspired by original artwork of the late Sacramento-based artist Don Reich. After the performance, UC Berkeley assistant professor of Music Tamara Roberts and Melford will talk about the work, Melford’s role as a curator of New Frequencies Fest/Jazz@YBCA, and the course they taught on “Improvising Community” which explored community engagement through musical improvisation.

 $50
Buy tickets online.


Film: The Lost Weekend
Friday, January 30 | 8:45 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from The Lost WeekendThe Lost Weekend is probably the forties’ most famous problem picture, and today loses little of its original power. Ray Milland’s Don Birnam is a failed writer, an anxiety-prone weakling who uses alcohol as an escape. A number of short, episodic scenes mount gradually in intensity until the two climactic passages, which occur respectively in an alcoholic ward and at Birnam’s apartment during a fit of delirium tremens. Wilder has seldom used his camera more daringly. Telephones, overturned lampshades and, of course, bottles loom menacingly in the foreground of the compositions, while John F. Seitz’s New York exteriors capture in drab grays and blacks a city stripped of glamour and allure. Holding it all together is Milland’s admirable performance.

 $5.50 BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley students,  $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and retirees; Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General Admission
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-5249.

SaturdayBack to top

Music: Kodo
Saturday, January 31 | 8 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall

Kodo performerKodo brings the primal power and bravura beauty of Japanese taiko drumming to stages throughout the world. This new performance transports the audience to a place with a nostalgic air conjuring the spirit of the Japanese people and their indigenous nature. Through the music of Kodo, the profound world of Mystery will unfold.

 $22-58
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-9988, or by emailing tickets@calperformances.org.


Film: Some Interviews on Personal Matters
Saturday, January 31 | 5 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from Some Interviews on Personal MattersSofiko, a young newspaper employee, is passionately involved in her work interviewing people who have submitted complaint letters to the editor. One of the women Sofiko interviews is her mother, and the pair’s onscreen relationship strongly resembles the tragic early life of the director and her mother, making this a very personal film for Lana Gogoberidze. A bold mixture of documentary and social-psychological drama—and the first film to make mention of Stalin’s camps—Some Interviews on Personal Matters makes powerful statements about women, work, family, and marriage that earned it international acclaim as the first feminist film of the Soviet cinema.

 $5.50 BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley students,  $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and retirees; Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General Admission
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-5249.


Lecture: A journey with the Bartrams, Hookers and other famous families in western botanical science and art
Saturday, January 31 | 1-3 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden

John Bartram and his son, William Bartram, were among the first active, professional American field botanists throughout the Revolutionary era. Father John was a collector of plants and seeds during his travels across eastern North America, eventually establishing arguably the first botanic garden in the New World. His son William was similarly well traveled, an avid collector, and an extraordinary artist of both plants and birds. At roughly the same time as the younger Bartram, William Jackson Hooker was burnishing his credentials as an intrepid English explorer, keen botanist and accomplished illustrator as well as the third director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. His son, Joseph Dalton Hooker followed in his father’s footsteps, becoming one of the greatest British botanists of the 19th century and Charles Darwin’s closest friend and confidante. Dr. Peggy Feidler will explore this history.

 Free with Garden Admission
Register online, or by calling 510-643-2755, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu.


Film: Histoire(s) du cinéma (Chapters 1 and 2)
Saturday, January 31 | 7:45 p.m. | PFA Theater

Godard mourns the death of cinema and chronicles its vitality in the dazzling video series Histoire(s) du cinéma. Histoire(s) du cinema emphasizes the influence film exercises on viewers—the impact of an image, the different realities that it provides, and the various frames of mind it engenders. Godard's purpose in these elliptical, epigrammatic montage essays is, he says, "to show that the history of film is, first of all, not history but consisting of histories. And then show that all histories are intertwined with the history of the twentieth century. Not showing a chronological order, names or dates, but a gust of wind, starting from the basic idea that the entire twentieth century was the stage for a merciless fight between image and sound (the newborn) and word (the grown–up, the government)."

 $5.50 BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley students,  $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and retirees; Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General Admission
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-5249.


Music: Matthew Polenzani, tenor, and Julius Drake, piano
Saturday, January 31 | 8 p.m. | First Congregational Church

Matthew PolenzaniMatthew Polenzani has become one of the most ubiquitous and beloved lyric tenors of his generation. Here he sings a wide range of repertoire, including Liszt's French songs set to poems by Victor Hugo, and Samuel Barber's emotionally expansive Hermit Songs, based on writings by medieval Irish monks.

 $32
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-9988, or by emailing tickets@calperformances.org.

SundayBack to top

Film: Histoire(s) du cinéma (Chapters 3 and 4)
Sunday, February 1 | 5 p.m. | PFA Theater

Godard mourns the death of cinema and chronicles its vitality in the dazzling video series Histoire(s) du cinéma. Histoire(s) du cinema emphasizes the influence film exercises on viewers—the impact of an image, the different realities that it provides, and the various frames of mind it engenders. Godard's purpose in these elliptical, epigrammatic montage essays is, he says, "to show that the history of film is, first of all, not history but consisting of histories. And then show that all histories are intertwined with the history of the twentieth century. Not showing a chronological order, names or dates, but a gust of wind, starting from the basic idea that the entire twentieth century was the stage for a merciless fight between image and sound (the newborn) and word (the grown–up, the government)."

 $5.50 BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley students,  $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and retirees; Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General Admission
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-5249.


Film: The Day is Longer Than the Night
Sunday, February 1 | 2 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from The Day is Longer Than The NightDistinguished by its location shooting, eye for traditional customs, and appealing performances, this ballad follows the life of Eva from the turn of the century through various milestones, both personal and historic. Each dramatic episode is linked to the next by a troupe of actors and musicians, who offer their own commentary.

 $5.50 BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley students,  $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and retirees; Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General Admission
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-5249.

MondayBack to top

Lecture: John Quincy Adams and the grand strategy of the Republic
Monday, February 2 | 2-4 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall | Note change in time

Charles Edel“America goes not abroad, in search of monsters to destroy”—John Quincy Adams’s famous words are often quoted to justify noninterference in other nations’ affairs. Yet when he spoke them, Adams was not advocating neutrality or passivity but rather outlining a national policy that balanced democratic idealism with a pragmatic understanding of the young republic’s capabilities and limitations. America’s rise from a confederation of revolutionary colonies to a world power is often treated as inevitable, but Charles N. Edel, professor at the U.S. Naval War College and author, argues that he served as the central architect of a grand strategy that shaped America’s rise.



Panel discussion: Innovative business models in food systems
Monday, February 2 | 2-6 p.m. | Tamalpais Room The David Brower Center, 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley

cooks in a kitchen collectiveInnovative entrepreneurial activities in food business have been flourishing in recent years, attempting to address issues of food insecurity, obesity, food distribution, sustainability, and improvements to nutritional qualities. These efforts range from the selling of smart phone applications for consumers to rate sources and nutrition of food products, food “hubs” to increase opportunities for producer aggregation, diverse startups for alternative food distribution or waste reduction, and more. Collective public-private initiatives to develop food hubs, involving communities within “foodsheds,” are also developing. Many of these efforts are aimed to address needs of underserved communities and/or create sustainable economic opportunities for farmers. This forum will address examples of these collaborative business initiatives from different regions, to address critical questions about the true costs and values of such efforts, the progress and health/social impacts, as well as challenges.



Lecture: Racial formation
Monday, February 2 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 470 Stephens Hall

Michael Omi and Howard WinantMichael Omi and Howard Winant discuss the new edition of Racial Formation in the United Sates (2015) published 20 years after the release of the previous edition. While the authors have maintained the overall structure of their classic work, they have completely revised and rewritten every chapter. The ambitious purpose of the book remains the same: to provide an account of how concepts of race are created and transformed, how they become the focus of political conflict, and how they come to shape and permeate both identities and institutions. A reception will follow the talk.



Course: The rise and future of the food movement
January 26 – April 27, 2015 every Monday with exceptions | 6:30-8:30 p.m. | Live streaming

Mark BittmanA UC Berkeley course with live streaming open to the public.

The food system is multi-disciplinary and complex, involving agroecology, agronomy, anthropology, economics, nutrition, sociology, and the arts. In this course, experts on organic agriculture, school lunch reform, food safety, hunger and food security, farm bill reform, farm-to-school efforts, urban agriculture, food sovereignty, and local food economies will offer perspectives making the food system more sustainable and equitable. Instructor: Garrison Sposito; co-hosts: food writer Mark Bittma and poet Robert Hass.


TuesdayBack to top

Music: Natural frequencies
Tuesday, February 3 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Campanile (Sather Tower)

Natural Frequencies
Bell towers have been used for centuries as a medium to effectively convey time, calls to prayer and community events, and warnings about invasions, fires, and floods. Although the latter are rare on the UC Berkeley campus, Sather tower is located directly above the Hayward fault line, where a major earthquake is considered likely in the next 30 years. The installation and performance include a unique composition of bells (both recorded and live) and lighting modulated in real time by data from the UC Berkeley seismometer inside the Hayward Fault. The title refers to the way that structures respond to external forces. 3 ten-minute live performances: 6:30, 7, 7:30.



Film: Titicut Follies
Tuesday, February 3 | 7 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from Titicut FolliesIn the late fifties, Frederick Wiseman, then a professor of law, took his students to observe the Bridgewater State Hospital for the Criminally Insane in Massachusetts. What they saw was a modern-day snake pit with dehumanized inmates offered little hope or dignity. Six years later Wiseman returned, this time with a 16mm camera. The result of his visit, Titicut Follies is a stark but compassionate look at the horrific conditions that persisted in the state-run institution. Representing the inmates, the state took Wiseman to court, charging that he had violated their wards’ privacy. Not until twenty-four years later was the injunction overturned and the film allowed to be shown. Wiseman has maintained all along that “the privacy that was really invaded was the privacy of the state officials to run the place in the way it was run.”

 $5.50 BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley students,  $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and retirees; Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General Admission
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-5249.


Lecture: Social justice and the people's health
Tuesday, February 3 | 4:30-6 p.m. | 101 Morgan Hall

Nancy KriegerThe essence of public health is the prevention of preventable suffering and the creation and promotion of a world in which all can truly thrive. By definition, public health must be dedicated to the prevention of health inequities -- unjust, unfair and preventable inequities in rates of disease and death across societal groups. Dr. Nancy Krieger, professor of epidemiology at Harvard University, will offer a framing of health inequities in their current and historical context. Dr. Krieger’s research focuses on social inequalities in health, and combines biochemistry, philosophy, science and history.


WednesdayBack to top

Film: Port of Shadows
Wednesday, February 4 | 3:10 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from Port of ShadowsPort of Shadows is a melancholy poem of life and death in the lower depths of Le Havre. Jean Gabin projects stubborn dignity and deep weariness as Jean, a deserter from the French colonial army who arrives one foggy night at an otherworldly waterfront dive. There he encounters a variety of underworld characters including a beautiful, troubled young woman (Michèle Morgan), who, like Jean, dreams of some kind of escape—from the past, from the shadowy streets, and from her sinister guardian, unsettlingly played by Michel Simon. Eugen Shufftan’s atmospheric cinematography matches the lyrical pessimism of Prévert’s dialogue.

 $5.50 UC Berkeley students,  $7.50 BAM/PFA Members,  $8.50 Seniors; Disabled persons; UC Berkeley faculty and staff; Non-UC Berkeley students; Youth 17 and under,  $11.50 General Admission
Buy tickets by calling 510-642-5249.


Lecture: I'm in the database (but nobody knows)
Wednesday, February 4 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 210 South Hall

Cynthia DworkYour data will only be used in aggregated form. What does this statement mean, and why is it so often included in privacy policies? Drawing from examples in the popular press and the technical literature, in this lecture Cynthia Dwork will scrutinize the common intuition that privacy is ensured by aggregation and show that information and hence privacy loss flows in mysterious ways. Arguing that the situation demands a mathematically rigorous treatment of privacy, the talk will introduce differential privacy, a field of research supporting a strong definition of privacy tailored to analysis of large data sets. This still-growing approach is thriving and is beginning to enter practice.



Panel discussion: Shooting rampage in Paris
Wednesday, February 4 | 5-7 p.m. | Goldberg Room 297 Boalt Hall, School of Law

A panel of prominent Berkeley faculty will meet to start a dialog on the shooting rampage in Paris and free speech, anti-Semitism, freedom of religion and Islamophobia. Panelists include Robert Alter of the Center for Jewish Studies, Hatem Bazian of Near Eastern Studies, Jeroen Dewulf of the Institute of European Studies, Marion Fourcade of Sociology, Saba Mahmood of Anthropology, Ed Wasserman from the Graduate School of Journalism and Tyler Stovall of History.



Performing arts: Les 7 Doigts de la Main Circus
Wednesday, February 4 | 8 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall

Aerial performer from Les 7 Doigts de la Main CircusThe Montreal-based contemporary circus troupe Les 7 Doigts de la Main present Sequence 8, a new production that explores some of the towering themes of our existence-connection, isolation, and alienation-on an intimate human scale. The troupe's charismatic young acrobats have the elegance of Cirque du Soleil aerialists and the athleticism of Olympic gymnasts, performing gravity-defying trapeze acts and explosive somersault routines, and wryly riffing on traditional circus arts like juggling and clowning.

 $22-58
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-9988, or by emailing tickets@calperformances.org.

ThursdayBack to top

Seminar: Stuxnet and the age of cyberwarfare
Thursday, February 5 | 1-2 p.m. | 240 Bechtel Engineering Center

Kim ZetterIn January 2010, inspectors with the International Atomic Energy Agency noticed that centrifuges at a uranium enrichment plant in Iran were failing and being replaced at an unprecedented rate. The cause of their failure was a complete mystery. Five months later, a computer security firm in Belarus was called in to troubleshoot computers in Iran that were caught in a reboot loop—crashing and rebooting repeatedly. At first, technicians with the firm believed the malicious code they found on the machines was a simple, routine piece of malware. But as they and other experts around the world investigated, they discovered a virus of unparalleled complexity that was designed to cause physical destruction to equipment used for Iran's nuclear program. They had, they soon learned, stumbled upon the world’s first digital weapon. WIRED journalist Kim Zetter will talk about how Stuxnet pulled off its feat and how a group of security geeks managed to unwittingly unravel a sabotage campaign years in the making.



Lecture: Maria Sibylla Merian, a passion for plants and insects
Thursday, February 5 | 10-11:30 a.m. | UC Botanical Garden

Botanical drawing by MerianThe artist and scientist Maria Sibylla Merian (1647-1717) was born in Frankfurt, Germany, into a middle-class family of publishers and artists. At the age of fifty-two, Merian traveled with her younger daughter to Suriname, a Dutch territory in South America, to paint its exotic insects. She was an adventurous woman ahead of her time, whose amazing career as an artist, writer and teacher revolutionized botany and zoology. Learn more about this fascinating woman.

 $12 / $10 members
Register online, or by calling 510-643-2755, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu.


Lunch poems: Joshua Weiner
Thursday, February 5 | 12:10-12:50 p.m. | Morrison Library Doe Library

Joshua WeinerJoshua Weiner is the author of three books of poetry, most recently, The Figure of a Man Being Swallowed by a Fish (2013). He is also the editor of At the Barriers: On the Poetry of Thom Gunn, and the poetry editor at Tikkun magazine. He is the recipient of a Whiting Writers’ Award, the Rome Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and a 2014 fellowship from the Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, among others. A professor of English at the University of Maryland, he lives with his family in Washington DC.



Special event: Lentil Underground book release
Thursday, February 5 | 6:30 p.m. | 105 North Gate Hall

Lentil dishMichael Pollan hosts a book release for Lentil Underground, the new book from Liz Carlisle, Fellow at the Center for Diversified Farming Systems at the Berkeley Food Institute. This event will be followed by a reception and book signing in the North Gate Hall Library. Enjoy a lentil tasting prepared by Montana farm-to-table chef Claudia Galofre-Krevat, and meet the Montana farmers featured in the book.


FridayBack to top

Film: One, Two, Three
Friday, February 6 | 8:45 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from One, Two, ThreeOne, Two, Three's travesty of Cold War politics, filmed in Berlin at the moment when the Wall went up, boils the war down to its essentials: "To hell with Krushchev!" "To hell with Frank Sinatra!" In a furiously paced slapstick entirely lacking The Apartment's humanity, no one is spared Wilder's acid pen: not the West Germans who, while "enjoying all the blessings of democracy"; nor the East Berliners, who don't return deposit bottles; nor the Russians, whose trio of emissaries are rather more decadent than their counterparts in Ninotchka; nor, finally, Coca Cola functionary/Yankee Doodle Dandy Jimmy Cagney, who speaks loudly and is all schtick. Pamela Tiffin's Patty Hearst–like runaway capitalist meets Horst Buchholz's runaway communist in Berlin—a bombed–out desert ripe for ideological battle, a place that, for Austrian–emigré Wilder, like Russia "is to get out of, not into."

 $5.50 BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley students,  $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and retirees; Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General Admission
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-5249.


Film: For Ever Mozart
Friday, February 6 | 7 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from For Ever MozartA group of young people set out from Switzerland for Sarajevo to mount a performance of a play by Alfred Musset and are gruesomely ambushed; meanwhile, a movie director is preparing an epic on war but can't get past the endless retakes. Godard's film is a Pirandellian provocation-"36 Characters in Search of History." It has been called Godard’s most profound film about war, and about the artist’s obligation to bear witness to his/her time.

 $5.50 BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley students,  $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and retirees; Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General Admission
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-5249.


Lecture: The philosophy of "as if"
Friday, February 6 | 4:10 p.m. | Chevron Auditorium International House

Anthony AppiahDr. Kwame Anthony Appiah, leading moral and political philosopher and professor of law and philosophy at NYU, will begin with an account of the ideas of the philosopher Hans Vahinger, who argued a century ago that almost all of our theories of the world – in every domain – involved understanding things “as if” what is in fact false were true. In political philosophy we grant people certain rights as if they were responsible, rational agents … which we are not. Dr. Appiah will use Vahinger’s ideas to discuss a contemporary philosophical proposal, that says that proposes another way that human beings can be understood.


SaturdayBack to top

Botanical garden: Botanical art for young artists
Saturday, February 7 | 1-3 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden

A child's hand drawing a flowerJoin artist and educator Sally Petru for an afternoon investigation to learn to draw both botanically accurate and artful representations of plants. All levels are welcome and parents/guardians are welcome to register as students. Suggested minimum age: 10 years old.

 $40 / $30 members
Register online, or by calling 510-643-2755, or by emailing gardenprograms@berkeley.edu.


Film: Five Graves to Cairo
Saturday, February 7 | 6:30 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from Five Graves to CairoFive Graves to Cairo was probably the first American film to deal maturely with World War II, bringing a welcome relief from the masochistic and jingoistic last-stand dramas that cluttered screens in 1942. The film created quite a stir at the time for its remarkable currency; it was begun after the fall of Tobruk and completed three months before Rommel lost the African Campaign.

 $5.50 BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley students,  $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and retirees; Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General Admission
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-5249.


Symposium: Fixing Pakistan's education
Saturday, February 7 | 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. | B 100 Blum Hall

Education in Pakistan flyerOver a third of Pakistan’s population of around 200 million is under the age of fifteen, yet it has the world’s second-highest number of children out of school. Pakistan’s youth could be the nation’s greatest asset—or its biggest liability. Turning around Pakistan’s broken education system potentially holds the key to a more peaceful and prosperous future for a country in one of the world’s most volatile regions. Using the themes of e-learning, technology, and innovation as broad organizing principles, our hope for this conference is that the discussions will stimulate creative thinking and lead to practical solutions to this problem.


Registration opens January 23. Register by February 5 online, or by calling 510-642-3608.


Exhibit: SPEED, science in motion
February 7 – May 3, 2015 every day | Lawrence Hall of Science

children enjoying the speed exhibitJoin us to learn about the science, engineering, and finesse that goes into Formula One racing and find out if you have what it takes to drive a 1,400 pound car at 200 mph. This exhibit is free with admission.



Film: Wildest Weather in the solar system 3D
February 7 – June 12, 2015 every day | 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. | National Geographic 3D Theater Lawrence Hall of Science

Wildest Weather in the Solar System film stillWitness the most beautiful, powerful, and mysterious weather phenomena in the solar system, shown in 3D at the Lawrence Hall of Science. From a storm the size of a 100-megaton hydrogen bomb, to a 400-year-old hurricane, to a dust tempest that could engulf entire planets, you'll be glad you live on Earth! Fly through the thick atmosphere of Venus, magnetic storms on the sun, liquid methane showers on Titan, and anticyclones whirling at hundreds of miles per hour on Jupiter.

 $4 plus admission
SundayBack to top

Film: Kiss Me, Stupid
Sunday, February 8 | 6:30 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from Kiss Me, StupidDeliriously vulgar sex comedy played as embittered film noir, Kiss Me, Stupid is one of Wilder's most vicious, devastating films. Dean Martin plays a version of himself that we can only hope is exaggerated, a lascivious lounge singer who drifts out of Vegas on a sea of booze and lands in desolate Climax, Nevada. He's taken in by piano teacher and frustrated pop songwriter Ray Walston, who, torn between his desire to butter up the insatiable Dino and his own pathological jealousy, hires "cocktail waitress" (euphemism) Kim Novak as a stand-in for his own dangerously attractive wife. The restored uncensored ending of tonight's print gets away with more than anyone could wish for.

 $5.50 BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley students,  $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and retirees; Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General Admission
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-5249.


Music: Peter Nero Trio, the Gershwin Project
Sunday, February 8 | 7 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall

Peter NeroTwo-time Grammy Award-winning pianist Peter Nero offers a program showcasing his lifelong immersion in the music of the Gershwins and his fluency in all the genres their music embraces- classical, swing, Broadway, blues, and jazz. Joined by bassist Michael Barnett, Nero romps through Gershwin tunes with wit and imagination, including songs from musicals and films like Strike Up the Band, Porgy and Bess, Funny Face, Girl Crazy, and Shall We Dance, as well as standards from the Great American Songbook.

 $36-86
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-9988, or by emailing tickets@calperformances.org.

MondayBack to top

Seminar: CRISPR Biology, from foundational research to translational technology
Monday, February 9 | 4-5 p.m. | tba Stanley Hall

Jennifer DoudnaJennifer Doudna, UC Berkeley professor and innovator of the CRISPR technique, discusses her revolutionary technique for genetic editing.



Lecture: Empowering youth to rebuild Hawaii's food system
Monday, February 9 | 4-5 p.m. | Morgan Lounge Morgan Hall

Kauai land, © Maureen Nandini MitraAlbie Miles, assistant professor of sustainable community food systems at the University of Hawai’i, West O’ahu, explores farming system biodiversity and the socio-economic and political obstacles to a more ecologically sustainable and socially equitable food system. Dr. Miles teaches a wide range of courses on the topics of agroecology and sustainable food systems, and is directing the development of a new undergraduate concentration in Sustainable Community Food Systems at the University of Hawai’i, West O’ahu.



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