The Switch: Reinventing American Freedom: Jefferson Memorial Lecture featuring John Fabian Witt

Lecture | September 17 | 4:10 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 John Fabian Witt, Allen H. Duffy Class of 1960 Professor of Law, Yale Law School

 Graduate Division

John Fabian Witt will present the Jefferson lecture on Thursday, September 17, 2015, in conjunction with the observance of Constitution Day. The lecture, entitled "The Switch: Reinventing American Freedom," will be held in the Chevron Auditorium of International House and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

About John Witt

Professor John Fabian Witt is Allen H. Duffy Class of 1960 Professor of Law at Yale Law School. Professor Witt’s work has ranged widely over the history of American law from the founding era to the Cold War. He has written about the law and ethics of warfare, about American law in a global context, and about the development of modern American legal institutions. His most recent book Lincoln’s Code: The Laws of War in American History was awarded the 2013 Bancroft Prize. His two previous books Patriots and Cosmopolitans: Hidden Histories of American Law (2007) and The Accidental Republic: Crippled Workingmen, Destitute Widows and the Remaking of American Law (2004) have also attained prominence in the recent literature of American historical and legal studies. His writings have appeared in many law journals and in the New York Times, Slate, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post.

About the Lecture

Witt’s Jefferson lecture will explore the subject of how American constitutional law was “reinvented,” as he proposes, during the early twentieth century. Taking up a small cast of characters who self-consciously aimed to disrupt the ideological structures of American law, Witt tells a story of social experiment and constitutional transformation that explains our constitutional past and offers powerful, if sometimes troubling, implications for our constitutional future.

 All Audiences

 All Audiences

 lectures@berkeley.edu, 510-643-7413