Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah -- Reading and Conversation

Reading - Nonfiction | March 8 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife

 RACHEL KAADZI GHANSAH

 Department of English

Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah is a journalist, essayist and critic whose work on such figures as Toni Morrison, James Baldwin, and Kendrick Lamar has been widely acclaimed and featured in The New York Times, The Believer, The Paris Review, VQR, and Transition, amongst several other outlets and publications. Her essay on the comedian Dave Chappelle, “If He Hollers Let Him Go,” received enthusiastic notice and was nominated for a National Magazine Award in 2014; her piece on Baldwin’s abandoned estate in France was included in The Fire This Time (ed. Jesmyn Ward) and anthologized in The Best American Essays (ed. Leslie Jamison). In July 2017 she published a deeply reported article in GQ on the murder of nine worshipers at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S. C. that galvanized conversation about the roots and contemporary outworking of white supremacist terror in America. She practices the hybrid form of the profile-essay with a particular and signature interest, and her many interlocutors—who have included Harry Belafonte, Dick Gregory, Ava DuVernay, bell hooks, and Missy Elliott—have informed her writing on black creative expression and its contexts. Her book, The Explainers & The Explorers, is forthcoming and she teaches in Columbia University’s MFA program.

Hosted by the English Department with generous sponsorship from the Townsend Center, the Multicultural Community Center, the Hotchkis Chair in English, and the Departments of English, African American Studies, Ethnic Studies, and Geography at UC Berkeley.

 nellis@berkeley.edu